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Title: A DNS study of self-accelerating cylindrical hydrogen–air flames with detailed chemistry

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1251894
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0001198; AC04-94AL85000; AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Combustion Institute
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-14 11:35:45; Journal ID: ISSN 1540-7489
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xin, Y. X., Yoo, C. S., Chen, J. H., and Law, C. K. A DNS study of self-accelerating cylindrical hydrogen–air flames with detailed chemistry. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.076.
Xin, Y. X., Yoo, C. S., Chen, J. H., & Law, C. K. A DNS study of self-accelerating cylindrical hydrogen–air flames with detailed chemistry. United States. doi:10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.076.
Xin, Y. X., Yoo, C. S., Chen, J. H., and Law, C. K. Thu . "A DNS study of self-accelerating cylindrical hydrogen–air flames with detailed chemistry". United States. doi:10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.076.
@article{osti_1251894,
title = {A DNS study of self-accelerating cylindrical hydrogen–air flames with detailed chemistry},
author = {Xin, Y. X. and Yoo, C. S. and Chen, J. H. and Law, C. K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.076},
journal = {Proceedings of the Combustion Institute},
number = 1,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.076

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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