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Title: The social value of mid-scale energy in Africa: Redefining value and redesigning energy to reduce poverty

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1251813
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy Research and Social Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-05-12 09:10:53; Journal ID: ISSN 2214-6296
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Miller, Clark A., Altamirano-Allende, Carlo, Johnson, Nathan, and Agyemang, Malena. The social value of mid-scale energy in Africa: Redefining value and redesigning energy to reduce poverty. Netherlands: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2014.12.013.
Miller, Clark A., Altamirano-Allende, Carlo, Johnson, Nathan, & Agyemang, Malena. The social value of mid-scale energy in Africa: Redefining value and redesigning energy to reduce poverty. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2014.12.013.
Miller, Clark A., Altamirano-Allende, Carlo, Johnson, Nathan, and Agyemang, Malena. Thu . "The social value of mid-scale energy in Africa: Redefining value and redesigning energy to reduce poverty". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2014.12.013.
@article{osti_1251813,
title = {The social value of mid-scale energy in Africa: Redefining value and redesigning energy to reduce poverty},
author = {Miller, Clark A. and Altamirano-Allende, Carlo and Johnson, Nathan and Agyemang, Malena},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.erss.2014.12.013},
journal = {Energy Research and Social Science},
number = C,
volume = 5,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.erss.2014.12.013

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