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Title: Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges

Abstract

Owing to their simple chemistry and structure, controllable geometry, and a plethora of unusual yet exciting transport properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as exceptional channels for fundamental nanofluidic studies, as well as building blocks for future fluidic devices that can outperform current technology in many applications. Leveraging the unique fluidic properties of CNTs in advanced systems requires a full understanding of their physical origin. Recent advancements in nanofabrication technology enable nanofluidic devices to be built with a single, nanometer-wide CNT as a fluidic pathway. These novel platforms with isolated CNT nanochannels offer distinct advantages for establishing quantitative structure–transport correlations in comparison with membranes containing many CNT pores. In addition, they are promising components for single-molecule sensors as well as for building nanotube-based circuits wherein fluidics and electronics can be coupled. With such advanced device architecture, molecular and ionic transport can be manipulated with vastly enhanced control for applications in sensing, separation, detection, and therapeutic delivery. Recent achievements in fabricating isolated-CNT nanofluidic platforms are highlighted, along with the most-significant findings each platform enables for water, ion, and molecular transport. Furthermore, the implications of these findings and remaining open questions on the exceptional fluidic properties of CNTs are also discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1251032
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-666424
Journal ID: ISSN 0935-9648
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 38; Journal ID: ISSN 0935-9648
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Guo, Shirui, Meshot, Eric R., Kuykendall, Tevye, Cabrini, Stefano, and Fornasiero, Francesco. Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1002/adma.201500372.
Guo, Shirui, Meshot, Eric R., Kuykendall, Tevye, Cabrini, Stefano, & Fornasiero, Francesco. Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges. United States. doi:10.1002/adma.201500372.
Guo, Shirui, Meshot, Eric R., Kuykendall, Tevye, Cabrini, Stefano, and Fornasiero, Francesco. Tue . "Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges". United States. doi:10.1002/adma.201500372. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1251032.
@article{osti_1251032,
title = {Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges},
author = {Guo, Shirui and Meshot, Eric R. and Kuykendall, Tevye and Cabrini, Stefano and Fornasiero, Francesco},
abstractNote = {Owing to their simple chemistry and structure, controllable geometry, and a plethora of unusual yet exciting transport properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as exceptional channels for fundamental nanofluidic studies, as well as building blocks for future fluidic devices that can outperform current technology in many applications. Leveraging the unique fluidic properties of CNTs in advanced systems requires a full understanding of their physical origin. Recent advancements in nanofabrication technology enable nanofluidic devices to be built with a single, nanometer-wide CNT as a fluidic pathway. These novel platforms with isolated CNT nanochannels offer distinct advantages for establishing quantitative structure–transport correlations in comparison with membranes containing many CNT pores. In addition, they are promising components for single-molecule sensors as well as for building nanotube-based circuits wherein fluidics and electronics can be coupled. With such advanced device architecture, molecular and ionic transport can be manipulated with vastly enhanced control for applications in sensing, separation, detection, and therapeutic delivery. Recent achievements in fabricating isolated-CNT nanofluidic platforms are highlighted, along with the most-significant findings each platform enables for water, ion, and molecular transport. Furthermore, the implications of these findings and remaining open questions on the exceptional fluidic properties of CNTs are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1002/adma.201500372},
journal = {Advanced Materials},
number = 38,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Journal Article:
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Cited by: 25works
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