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Title: Dosimetry of a 90 Y-hydroxide liquid brachytherapy treatment approach to canine osteosarcoma using PET/CT

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1250903
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0007371; SC0008433
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Radiation and Isotopes
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-05-29 09:04:05; Journal ID: ISSN 0969-8043
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhou, Jien Jie, Gonzalez, Arnulfo, Lenox, Mark W., Fossum, Theresa W., Frank, R. Keith, Simon, Jaime, Stearns, Stan, Ruoff, Catherine M., Wendt, Richard E., and Akabani, Gamal. Dosimetry of a 90 Y-hydroxide liquid brachytherapy treatment approach to canine osteosarcoma using PET/CT. United Kingdom: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apradiso.2014.11.009.
Zhou, Jien Jie, Gonzalez, Arnulfo, Lenox, Mark W., Fossum, Theresa W., Frank, R. Keith, Simon, Jaime, Stearns, Stan, Ruoff, Catherine M., Wendt, Richard E., & Akabani, Gamal. Dosimetry of a 90 Y-hydroxide liquid brachytherapy treatment approach to canine osteosarcoma using PET/CT. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.apradiso.2014.11.009.
Zhou, Jien Jie, Gonzalez, Arnulfo, Lenox, Mark W., Fossum, Theresa W., Frank, R. Keith, Simon, Jaime, Stearns, Stan, Ruoff, Catherine M., Wendt, Richard E., and Akabani, Gamal. Sun . "Dosimetry of a 90 Y-hydroxide liquid brachytherapy treatment approach to canine osteosarcoma using PET/CT". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.apradiso.2014.11.009.
@article{osti_1250903,
title = {Dosimetry of a 90 Y-hydroxide liquid brachytherapy treatment approach to canine osteosarcoma using PET/CT},
author = {Zhou, Jien Jie and Gonzalez, Arnulfo and Lenox, Mark W. and Fossum, Theresa W. and Frank, R. Keith and Simon, Jaime and Stearns, Stan and Ruoff, Catherine M. and Wendt, Richard E. and Akabani, Gamal},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.apradiso.2014.11.009},
journal = {Applied Radiation and Isotopes},
number = C,
volume = 97,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.apradiso.2014.11.009

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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  • Yttrium-90 microsphere brachytherapy of the liver exploits the distinctive features of the liver anatomy to treat liver malignancies with beta radiation and is gaining more wide spread clinical use. This report provides a general overview of microsphere liver brachytherapy and assists the treatment team in creating local treatment practices to provide safe and efficient patient treatment. Suggestions for future improvements are incorporated with the basic rationale for the therapy and currently used procedures. Imaging modalities utilized and their respective quality assurance are discussed. General as well as vendor specific delivery procedures are reviewed. The current dosimetry models are reviewed andmore » suggestions for dosimetry advancement are made. Beta activity standards are reviewed and vendor implementation strategies are discussed. Radioactive material licensing and radiation safety are discussed given the unique requirements of microsphere brachytherapy. A general, team-based quality assurance program is reviewed to provide guidance for the creation of the local procedures. Finally, recommendations are given on how to deliver the current state of the art treatments and directions for future improvements in the therapy.« less
  • Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to developmore » a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target (D90) was 53 Gy (range: 13–125 Gy).Conclusions: A three-dimensional inpatient dose reconstruction method has been developed that is based on the PET/CT data of a patient treated with {sup 90}Y microspheres. It allows for a complete description of the absorbed dose by the tumor and critical structures. It represents the first step in building predictive models for treatment outcomes for patients receiving this therapeutic modality as well as it allows for better analysis of patients' dose response and will ultimately improve future treatment administration.« less
  • Purpose: The accuracy of PET-based post-treatment dosimetry of yttrium-90 microspheres has been improving over the past decade and is now at a stage, permitting volumetric dose-outcome studies. We outline the recent advances and identify the physical limitations to the accuracy of the dose calculations. Methods: Convolution of the measured PET activity density distribution with a pre-calculated voxel-dose-kernel (VDK) is the most widely used method for dose reconstruction. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the beta+ branching ratio as well as the micro-dosimetric characteristics of electron interactions within the microsphere is essential for the computation of the dose kernel. We implement a modelmore » of the microspheres used in our clinic to calculate the modified electron energy spectrum at the microsphere’s surface and to determine the impact of self-shielding on the dose reconstruction. The three-dimensional dose distributions obtained for 10 patients treated with radio-embolization with yttrium-90 microspheres are evaluated and various DVH markers are investigated for correlation with outcome. Results: The methods for reducing the overall computation uncertainty are systematically outlined in this presentation. Since the latest experimental data on yttrium-90 beta+ branching ratio has a relative uncertainty of 1.5%, all contributing factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations must be brought to a sub 1% level. The self-shielding within the microspheres is found to be responsible for up to 6% reduction of the reconstructed dose in low-gradient regions and must be taken into account. The contribution of trace amounts of other beta+ emitters introduced during the manufacturing process is also discussed. Conclusion: The accelerating pace of clinical adoption of PET-based post-treatment dosimetry is mainly due to advances in both quantitative PET imaging and physical models of dose deposition. We show that the overall physical dose uncertainty in the convolution step can be further reduced, thus making ongoing multi-institutional dose-outcome studies even more reliable.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the time course of prostatic edema and the effect on the dose-volume histograms of the prostate for patients treated with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. A transrectal ultrasound-based preplan was performed 4 weeks before implantation and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based postimplant dosimetry was performed on the day after implantation (Day 1) and 30 days after implantation (Day 30). The prostate volume, prostate volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}), and dose covering 90% of the prostate (D{sub 90}) were evaluatedmore » with prostatic edema over time. Results: Prostatic edema was greatest on Day 1, with the mean prostate volume 36% greater than the preplan transrectal ultrasound-based volume; it thereafter decreased over time. It was 9% greater than preplan volume on Day 30. The V{sub 100} increased 5.7% from Day 1 to Day 30, and the D{sub 90} increased 13.1% from Day 1 to Day 30. The edema ratio (postplan/preplan) on Day 1 of low-quality implants with a V{sub 100} of <80% was significantly greater than that of intermediate- to high-quality implants (>80% V{sub 100}; p = 0.0272). The lower V{sub 100} on Day 1 showed a greater increase from Day 1 to Day 30. A V{sub 100} on Day 1 of >92% is unlikely to increase >0% during the interval studied. Conclusion: Low-quality implants on Day 1 were highly associated with edema; however, such a low-quality implant on Day 1, with significant edema, tended to improve by Day 30. If a high-quality implant (V100 >92%) can be obtained on Day 1, a re-examination is no longer necessary.« less