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Title: MERCURY SPECIATION IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE:DETERMINATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE HANDLING AND DISPOSAL

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1250753
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2016-00021
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wilmarth, Bill, Crawford, Charles, Peters, Thomas, Reigel, Marissa, Garcia-Strickland, P., and Shah, Hasmukh. MERCURY SPECIATION IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE:DETERMINATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE HANDLING AND DISPOSAL. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Wilmarth, Bill, Crawford, Charles, Peters, Thomas, Reigel, Marissa, Garcia-Strickland, P., & Shah, Hasmukh. MERCURY SPECIATION IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE:DETERMINATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE HANDLING AND DISPOSAL. United States.
Wilmarth, Bill, Crawford, Charles, Peters, Thomas, Reigel, Marissa, Garcia-Strickland, P., and Shah, Hasmukh. Fri . "MERCURY SPECIATION IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE:DETERMINATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE HANDLING AND DISPOSAL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1250753.
@article{osti_1250753,
title = {MERCURY SPECIATION IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE:DETERMINATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE HANDLING AND DISPOSAL},
author = {Wilmarth, Bill and Crawford, Charles and Peters, Thomas and Reigel, Marissa and Garcia-Strickland, P. and Shah, Hasmukh},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 08 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Fri Jan 08 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

Conference:
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  • The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are addedmore » to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests and was spiked with the required amount of noble metals immediately prior to performing the test. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. SME cycles were also performed during six of the tests.« less
  • This paper discusses the high-level radioactive waste that has accumulated at the Savannah River Site and is stored in large underground steel tanks. Programs to remove the soluble waste from the storage tanks, decontaminate it by removing cesium and strontium, and dispose of the resulting low-level alkaline salt solution are described. Recent modifications and the current status of the in-tank precipitation and the saltstone processes are described.
  • Using new criteria developed by the High-Level Waste Tank Safety Task Force, the Savannah River Site (SRS) identified six safety issues in the SRS tank farms. None of the safety issues were priority 1, the most significant issues handled by the Task Force. This paper discusses the safety issues and the programs for resolving each of them.
  • Using new criteria developed by the High-Level Waste Tank Safety Task Force, the Savannah River Site (SRS) identified six safety issues in the SRS tank farms. None of the safety issues were priority 1, the most significant issues handled by the Task Force. This paper discusses the safety issues and the programs for resolving each of them.
  • Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at Savannah River Site (SRS) has been actively reducing the inventory of radioactive material stored in its Shielded Cells Facility. Part of this inventory was a large number of 500 mL stainless steel beakers containing SRS radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge immobilized in a borosilicate glass. Since the beakers at SRNL contain HLW, federal mandate requires that this material be shipped to the geologic repository for permanent disposal. A detailed assessment was prepared that included a full characterization of the borosilicate glass as well as an evaluation of the impacts of placing the SRNLmore » beakers in the canisters produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additionally, special equipment had to be designed and fabricated for use at SRNL along with the vitrification facility since DWPF was designed only to receive HLW slurries pumped from SRS waste tanks that would be processed into molten glass and poured from the melter into DWPF canisters. Different tasks were required to be performed at SRNL for implementation of this activity including confirmation of the beaker material, beaker tab removal and loading of the magazine tube and magazine rack with the beakers. New as well as existing procedures were utilized at DWPF to place the beakers into DWPF canisters and fill the canisters with molten borosilicate glass. This disposal path for the HLW glass-filled stainless steel beakers sets a precedent throughout the DOE complex since it is expected that other non-routine HLW at SRS and other DOE production facilities will need to be placed in permanent disposal at the federal repository. (authors)« less