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Title: High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

Abstract

The Matter in Extreme Conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source holds great promise for novel pump-probe experiments to make new discoveries in high- energy density science. Recently, our experiments have demonstrated the first spectrally- resolved measurements of plasmons using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam. Forward x-ray Thomson scattering spectra from isochorically heated solid aluminum show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV from the incident 8 keV elastic scattering feature. In this spectral range, the simultaneously measured backscatter spectrum shows no spectral features indicating observation of collective plasmon oscillations on a scattering length comparable to the screening length. Moreover, this technique is a prerequisite for Thomson scattering measurements in compressed matter where the plasmon shift is a sensitive function of the free electron density and where the plasmon intensity provides information on temperature.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1249059
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physics. Conference Series
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 688; Journal ID: ISSN 1742-6588
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Glenzer, S. H., Fletcher, L. B., and Hastings, J. B. High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/688/1/012020.
Glenzer, S. H., Fletcher, L. B., & Hastings, J. B. High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source. United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/688/1/012020.
Glenzer, S. H., Fletcher, L. B., and Hastings, J. B. Fri . "High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source". United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/688/1/012020. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1249059.
@article{osti_1249059,
title = {High-Energy Density science at the Linac Coherent Light Source},
author = {Glenzer, S. H. and Fletcher, L. B. and Hastings, J. B.},
abstractNote = {The Matter in Extreme Conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source holds great promise for novel pump-probe experiments to make new discoveries in high- energy density science. Recently, our experiments have demonstrated the first spectrally- resolved measurements of plasmons using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam. Forward x-ray Thomson scattering spectra from isochorically heated solid aluminum show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV from the incident 8 keV elastic scattering feature. In this spectral range, the simultaneously measured backscatter spectrum shows no spectral features indicating observation of collective plasmon oscillations on a scattering length comparable to the screening length. Moreover, this technique is a prerequisite for Thomson scattering measurements in compressed matter where the plasmon shift is a sensitive function of the free electron density and where the plasmon intensity provides information on temperature.},
doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/688/1/012020},
journal = {Journal of Physics. Conference Series},
number = ,
volume = 688,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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  • High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, withmore » 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a more detailed plans for experiments (Ch. VI), highlighting the uniqueness the HEDS endstation will play in providing mission-relevant HED data and in the development of the field. One of the more exciting aspects of NNSA-relevant experiments on LCLS is that, given the extraordinary investment and consequent advances in accurate atomic-scale simulations of matter (to a large extent via the Accelerated Scientific Computing program sponsored by NNSA), the facility will provide a platform that, for the first time, will permit experiments in the regimes of interest at the time and spatial scales of the simulations. In Chapter III, the report places the potential of LCLS with an HED science endstation in the context of science required by NNSA, as well as explicating the relationship of NNSA and HED science in general. Chapter IV discusses 4th-generation light sources, like LCLS, in the context of other laboratory technologies presently utilized by NNSA. The report concludes, noting that an HED endstation on LCLS can provide access to data in regimes that are relevant to NNSA needs but no mechanism exists for providing such data. The endstation will also serve to build a broad-based community in the 'X-Games' of physics. The science generated by the facility will be a collaboration of NNSA-based laboratory scientists and university-based researchers. The LCLS endstation fulfills the need for an intermediate-scale facility capable of delivering fundamental advances and mission-relevant research in high energy density science.« less
  • The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) provides a tight soft X-ray focus into one of three experimental endstations. The flexible instrument design is optimized for studying a wide variety of phenomena requiring peak intensity. There is a suite of spectrometers and two photon area detectors available. An optional mirror-based split-and-delay unit can be used for X-ray pump–probe experiments. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the imaging, time-resolved spectroscopy and high-power density capabilities of the AMO instrument.
  • This article discusses the development and calibration of the x-ray reflective and diffractive elements for the Soft X-ray Materials Science (SXR) beamline of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron laser (FEL), designed for operation in the 500 – 2000 eV region. The surface topography of three Si mirror substrates and two Si diffraction grating substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical profilometry. The figure of the mirror substrates was also verified via surface slope measurements with a long trace profiler. A boron carbide (B 4C) coating especially optimized for the LCLS FEL conditions was deposited onmore » all SXR mirrors and gratings. Coating thickness uniformity of 0.14 nm root mean square (rms) across clear apertures extending to 205 mm length was demonstrated for all elements, as required to preserve the coherent wavefront of the LCLS source. The reflective performance of the mirrors and the diffraction efficiency of the gratings were calibrated at beamline 6.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. To verify the integrity of the nanometer-scale grating structure, the grating topography was examined by AFM before and after coating. This is to our knowledge the first time B 4C-coated diffraction gratings are demonstrated for operation in the soft x-ray region.« less
  • Electron bunch requirements for single-pass saturation of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating at full transverse coherence in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode include: a high peak current, a sufficiently low relative energy spread, and a transverse emittance {epsilon}[r-m] satisfying the condition {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength of the FEL. In the insertion device that induces the coherent amplification, the prepared electron bunch must be kept on a trajector sufficiently collinear with the amplified photons without significant dilution of its transverse density. In this paper we discuss a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) based on a high energymore » accelerator such as, e.g., the 3 km S-band structure at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), followed by a long high-precision undulator with superimposed quadrupole (FODO) focusing, to fulfill the given requirements for SASE operation in the 1000 A{minus}1 A range. The electron source for the linac, an RF gun with a laser-excited photocathode featuring a normalized emittance in the 1--3 mm-mrad range, a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 3 ps, and approximately 10{sup {minus}9} C/bunch, is a primary determinant of the required low transverse and longitudinal emittances. Acceleration of the injected bunch to energies in the 5--25 GeV range is used to reduce the relative longitudinal energy spread in the bunch, as well as to reduce the transverse emittance to values consistent with the cited wavelength regime. Two longitudinal compression stages are employed to increase the peak bunch current to the 2--5 kA levels required for sufficiently rapid saturation. The output radiation is delivered, via a grazing-incidence mirror bank, to optical instrumentation and a multi-user beam line system. Technological requirements for LCLS operation at 40 A, 4.5 A, and 1.5 A are examined.« less