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Title: HIGH DENSITY, HIGH VELOCITY SLIDING AT ALUMINUM INTERFACES

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1248093
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-1996
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 13TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON PLASTICITY ; 200706 ; ANCHORAGE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

HAMMERBERG, JAMES E., RAVELO, RAMON J., GERMANN, TIMOTHY C., and HOLIAN, BRAD L. HIGH DENSITY, HIGH VELOCITY SLIDING AT ALUMINUM INTERFACES. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
HAMMERBERG, JAMES E., RAVELO, RAMON J., GERMANN, TIMOTHY C., & HOLIAN, BRAD L. HIGH DENSITY, HIGH VELOCITY SLIDING AT ALUMINUM INTERFACES. United States.
HAMMERBERG, JAMES E., RAVELO, RAMON J., GERMANN, TIMOTHY C., and HOLIAN, BRAD L. Mon . "HIGH DENSITY, HIGH VELOCITY SLIDING AT ALUMINUM INTERFACES". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1248093.
@article{osti_1248093,
title = {HIGH DENSITY, HIGH VELOCITY SLIDING AT ALUMINUM INTERFACES},
author = {HAMMERBERG, JAMES E. and RAVELO, RAMON J. and GERMANN, TIMOTHY C. and HOLIAN, BRAD L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 26 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 26 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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