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Title: BEYOND THE ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER: NONLINEAR DETECTORS FOR WEAK SIGNALS IN HIGH-DIMENSIONAL CLUTTER

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1248089
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-1945
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPIE DEFENCE AND SECURITY SYMPOSIUM ; 200704 ; ORLANDO
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

THEILER, JAMES P., FOY, BERNARD R., and FRASER, ANDREW M.. BEYOND THE ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER: NONLINEAR DETECTORS FOR WEAK SIGNALS IN HIGH-DIMENSIONAL CLUTTER. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
THEILER, JAMES P., FOY, BERNARD R., & FRASER, ANDREW M.. BEYOND THE ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER: NONLINEAR DETECTORS FOR WEAK SIGNALS IN HIGH-DIMENSIONAL CLUTTER. United States.
THEILER, JAMES P., FOY, BERNARD R., and FRASER, ANDREW M.. Fri . "BEYOND THE ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER: NONLINEAR DETECTORS FOR WEAK SIGNALS IN HIGH-DIMENSIONAL CLUTTER". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1248089.
@article{osti_1248089,
title = {BEYOND THE ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER: NONLINEAR DETECTORS FOR WEAK SIGNALS IN HIGH-DIMENSIONAL CLUTTER},
author = {THEILER, JAMES P. and FOY, BERNARD R. and FRASER, ANDREW M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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