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Title: A survey of trace contaminants in natural gas liquids

Abstract

A survey of selected contaminants in natural gas liquids (NGL) has been completed for the purpose of determining whether more stringent NGL specifications should be considered by the industry. The survey involved the analysis of over 45 samples from seven independent processors. The trace contaminants that were analyzed include olefins, oxygenated compounds, fluoride, mercury, and arsenic. Not unsurprisingly, the highest levels of olefins were found in the corresponding hydrocarbon streams, (i.e., propylene in the propane streams). The highest levels of oxygenated compounds were found in the propane and raw make streams. The highest fluoride levels were found in the gasoline samples. And finally, for the most part, the mercury and arsenic levels were to close to the detection limits for these samples ({approximately}10 ppb for mercury and {approximately}50 ppb for arsenic) to be able to accurately determine if these contaminants were present in any of the samples. A more exhaustive study would be needed to analyze for these components below these levels. For the olefins, a gas chromatography procedure was used to determine the levels of pentenes and lighter olefins. For the oxygenated compounds, a water extraction method with a gas chromatography follow up was used. This method measures themore » levels of all water soluble oxygenated compounds, such as the butanols and lighter alcohols as well as acetone. The fluoride analysis involved the determination of the total fluoride per a modified UOP Method 619-83, the Wickbold method. The mercury and arsenic analyses were obtained by first passing the vapor portion of the samples through appropriate trapping media and then desorbing the traps directly into an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
124628
Report Number(s):
CONF-9503132-
TRN: IM9548%%218
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: 74. annual Gas Processors Association (GPA) meeting, San Antonio, TX (United States), 13-15 Mar 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings 74. annual convention Gas Processors Association, 1995; PB: 378 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; TRACE AMOUNTS; ALKENES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; FLUORIDES; MERCURY; ARSENIC; KETONES; ALCOHOLS; MEASURING METHODS; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; COMPILED DATA

Citation Formats

Wharry, S.M., and Sung, N.J.. A survey of trace contaminants in natural gas liquids. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Wharry, S.M., & Sung, N.J.. A survey of trace contaminants in natural gas liquids. United States.
Wharry, S.M., and Sung, N.J.. 1995. "A survey of trace contaminants in natural gas liquids". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_124628,
title = {A survey of trace contaminants in natural gas liquids},
author = {Wharry, S.M. and Sung, N.J.},
abstractNote = {A survey of selected contaminants in natural gas liquids (NGL) has been completed for the purpose of determining whether more stringent NGL specifications should be considered by the industry. The survey involved the analysis of over 45 samples from seven independent processors. The trace contaminants that were analyzed include olefins, oxygenated compounds, fluoride, mercury, and arsenic. Not unsurprisingly, the highest levels of olefins were found in the corresponding hydrocarbon streams, (i.e., propylene in the propane streams). The highest levels of oxygenated compounds were found in the propane and raw make streams. The highest fluoride levels were found in the gasoline samples. And finally, for the most part, the mercury and arsenic levels were to close to the detection limits for these samples ({approximately}10 ppb for mercury and {approximately}50 ppb for arsenic) to be able to accurately determine if these contaminants were present in any of the samples. A more exhaustive study would be needed to analyze for these components below these levels. For the olefins, a gas chromatography procedure was used to determine the levels of pentenes and lighter olefins. For the oxygenated compounds, a water extraction method with a gas chromatography follow up was used. This method measures the levels of all water soluble oxygenated compounds, such as the butanols and lighter alcohols as well as acetone. The fluoride analysis involved the determination of the total fluoride per a modified UOP Method 619-83, the Wickbold method. The mercury and arsenic analyses were obtained by first passing the vapor portion of the samples through appropriate trapping media and then desorbing the traps directly into an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

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