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Title: Evaluation of Urban Vehicle Tracking Algorithms.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1245926
Report Number(s):
SAND2015-2201C
579553
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the IEEE Aerospace Conference held March 7-14, 2015 in Big Sky, Montana.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hansen, Ross L., Joshua Love, Melgaard, David K., Byrne, Raymond Harry, Karelitz, David B., and Pitts, Todd. Evaluation of Urban Vehicle Tracking Algorithms.. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Hansen, Ross L., Joshua Love, Melgaard, David K., Byrne, Raymond Harry, Karelitz, David B., & Pitts, Todd. Evaluation of Urban Vehicle Tracking Algorithms.. United States.
Hansen, Ross L., Joshua Love, Melgaard, David K., Byrne, Raymond Harry, Karelitz, David B., and Pitts, Todd. Sun . "Evaluation of Urban Vehicle Tracking Algorithms.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1245926.
@article{osti_1245926,
title = {Evaluation of Urban Vehicle Tracking Algorithms.},
author = {Hansen, Ross L. and Joshua Love and Melgaard, David K. and Byrne, Raymond Harry and Karelitz, David B. and Pitts, Todd},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
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