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Title: TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy

Abstract

This report summarizes a four-phase process used to describe the strategy in developing modeling and simulation software for the Transient Reactor Test Facility. The four phases of this research and development task are identified as (1) full core transient calculations with feedback, (2) experiment modeling, (3) full core plus experiment simulation and (4) quality assurance. The document describes the four phases, the relationship between these research phases, and anticipated needs within each phase.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1245526
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-15-36893
TRN: US1601232
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; TREAT REACTOR; QUALITY ASSURANCE; FEEDBACK; TRANSIENTS; REACTOR CORES; NUCLEAR FUELS; PERFORMANCE; Modeling; NEAMS; TREAT

Citation Formats

DeHart, Mark David. TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1245526.
DeHart, Mark David. TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy. United States. doi:10.2172/1245526.
DeHart, Mark David. Tue . "TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy". United States. doi:10.2172/1245526. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1245526.
@article{osti_1245526,
title = {TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy},
author = {DeHart, Mark David},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes a four-phase process used to describe the strategy in developing modeling and simulation software for the Transient Reactor Test Facility. The four phases of this research and development task are identified as (1) full core transient calculations with feedback, (2) experiment modeling, (3) full core plus experiment simulation and (4) quality assurance. The document describes the four phases, the relationship between these research phases, and anticipated needs within each phase.},
doi = {10.2172/1245526},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report summarizes university research activities performed in support of TREAT modeling and simulation research. It is a compilation of annual research reports from four universities: University of Florida, Texas A&M University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Oregon State University. The general research topics are, respectively, (1) 3-D time-dependent transport with TDKENO/KENO-VI, (2) implementation of the Improved Quasi-Static method in Rattlesnake/MOOSE for time-dependent radiation transport approximations, (3) improved treatment of neutron physics representations within TREAT using OpenMC, and (4) steady state modeling of the minimum critical core of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT).
  • Idaho National Laboratory is currently evolving the modeling and simulation (M&S) capability that will enable improved core operation as well as design and analysis of TREAT experiments. This M&S capability primarily uses MAMMOTH, a reactor physics application being developed under the Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. MAMMOTH allows the coupling of a number of other MOOSE-based applications. In support of this research, INL is working with four universities to explore advanced solution methods that will complement or augment capabilities in MAMMOTH. This report consists of a collection of year end summaries of research from the universities performed inmore » support of TREAT modeling and simulation. This research was led by Prof. Sedat Goluoglu at the University of Florida, Profs. Jim Morel and Jean Ragusa at Texas A&M University, Profs. Benoit Forget and Kord Smith at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Prof. Leslie Kerby of Idaho State University and Prof. Barry Ganapol of University of Arizona. A significant number of students were supported at various levels though the projects and, for some, also as interns at INL.« less
  • The purpose of this report is to establish a strategy for modeling and simulation of candidate hybrid energy systems. Modeling and simulation is necessary to design, evaluate, and optimize the system technical and economic performance. Accordingly, this report first establishes the simulation requirements to analysis candidate hybrid systems. Simulation fidelity levels are established based on the temporal scale, real and synthetic data availability or needs, solution accuracy, and output parameters needed to evaluate case-specific figures of merit. Accordingly, the associated computational and co-simulation resources needed are established; including physical models when needed, code assembly and integrated solutions platforms, mathematical solvers,more » and data processing. This report first attempts to describe the figures of merit, systems requirements, and constraints that are necessary and sufficient to characterize the grid and hybrid systems behavior and market interactions. Loss of Load Probability (LOLP) and effective cost of Effective Cost of Energy (ECE), as opposed to the standard Levelized Cost of Electricty (LCOE), are introduced as technical and economical indices for integrated energy system evaluations. Financial assessment methods are subsequently introduced for evaluation of non-traditional, hybrid energy systems. Algorithms for coupled and iterative evaluation of the technical and economic performance are subsequently discussed. This report further defines modeling objectives, computational tools, solution approaches, and real-time data collection and processing (in some cases using real test units) that will be required to model, co-simulate, and optimize; (a) an energy system components (e.g., power generation unit, chemical process, electricity management unit), (b) system domains (e.g., thermal, electrical or chemical energy generation, conversion, and transport), and (c) systems control modules. Co-simulation of complex, tightly coupled, dynamic energy systems requires multiple simulation tools, potentially developed in several programming languages and resolved on separate time scales. Whereas further investigation and development of hybrid concepts will provide a more complete understanding of the joint computational and physical modeling needs, this report highlights areas in which co-simulation capabilities are warranted. The current development status, quality assurance, availability and maintainability of simulation tools that are currently available for hybrid systems modeling is presented. Existing gaps in the modeling and simulation toolsets and development needs are subsequently discussed. This effort will feed into a broader Roadmap activity for designing, developing, and demonstrating hybrid energy systems.« less
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