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Title: Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space

Abstract

Modeled terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle feedbacks contribute substantial uncertainty to projections of future climate. The limitations of current observing networks contribute to this uncertainty. Here we present a current climatology of global model predictions and observations for photosynthesis, biomass, plant diversity and plant functional diversity. Carbon cycle tipping points occur in terrestrial regions where fluxes or stocks are largest, and where biological variability is highest, the tropics and Arctic/Boreal zones. Global observations are predominately in the mid-latitudes and are sparse in high and low latitude ecosystems. Observing and forecasting ecosystem change requires sustained observations of sufficient density in time and space in critical regions. Using data and theory available now, we can develop a strategy to detect and forecast terrestrial carbon cycle-climate interactions, by combining in situ and remote techniques.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [5]
  1. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA
  2. Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama St. Stanford CA 94305 USA
  3. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA
  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999 MSIN: K9-34 Richland WA 99352 USA
  5. College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, North Park Road Streatham Campus Harrison Building Exeter EX4 4QF UK
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1244815
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-103145
Journal ID: ISSN 1354-1013
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Global Change Biology; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Terrestrial; ecosystems; carbon cycle; space; climate; uncertainty; global; model

Citation Formats

Schimel, David, Pavlick, Ryan, Fisher, Joshua B., Asner, Gregory P., Saatchi, Sassan, Townsend, Philip, Miller, Charles, Frankenberg, Christian, Hibbard, Kathy, and Cox, Peter. Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1111/gcb.12822.
Schimel, David, Pavlick, Ryan, Fisher, Joshua B., Asner, Gregory P., Saatchi, Sassan, Townsend, Philip, Miller, Charles, Frankenberg, Christian, Hibbard, Kathy, & Cox, Peter. Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space. United States. doi:10.1111/gcb.12822.
Schimel, David, Pavlick, Ryan, Fisher, Joshua B., Asner, Gregory P., Saatchi, Sassan, Townsend, Philip, Miller, Charles, Frankenberg, Christian, Hibbard, Kathy, and Cox, Peter. Fri . "Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space". United States. doi:10.1111/gcb.12822.
@article{osti_1244815,
title = {Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space},
author = {Schimel, David and Pavlick, Ryan and Fisher, Joshua B. and Asner, Gregory P. and Saatchi, Sassan and Townsend, Philip and Miller, Charles and Frankenberg, Christian and Hibbard, Kathy and Cox, Peter},
abstractNote = {Modeled terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle feedbacks contribute substantial uncertainty to projections of future climate. The limitations of current observing networks contribute to this uncertainty. Here we present a current climatology of global model predictions and observations for photosynthesis, biomass, plant diversity and plant functional diversity. Carbon cycle tipping points occur in terrestrial regions where fluxes or stocks are largest, and where biological variability is highest, the tropics and Arctic/Boreal zones. Global observations are predominately in the mid-latitudes and are sparse in high and low latitude ecosystems. Observing and forecasting ecosystem change requires sustained observations of sufficient density in time and space in critical regions. Using data and theory available now, we can develop a strategy to detect and forecast terrestrial carbon cycle-climate interactions, by combining in situ and remote techniques.},
doi = {10.1111/gcb.12822},
journal = {Global Change Biology},
number = 5,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Fri Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}