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Title: Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems

Abstract

The main objective of this project is to develop technologies and experimental techniques for studying the dynamics of physiological responses of plants to changes in their interface with the local environment and to educate a new generation of scientists in an interdisciplinary environment of biology, physics and engineering. Also an important goal is to perform measurements to demonstrate the new data that can be produced and made available to the plant-biology community using the imaging technologies and experimental techniques developed in this project. The study of the plant-environment interface includes a wide range of topics in plant physiology, e.g., the root-soil interface, resource availability, impact of herbivores, influence of microbes on root surface, and responses to toxins in the air and soil. The initial scientific motivation for our work is to improve understanding of the mechanisms for physiological responses to abrupt changes in the local environment, in particular, the responses that result in short-term adjustments in resource (e.g., sugars, nutrients and water) allocations. Data of time-dependent responses of plants to environmental changes are essential in developing mechanistic models for substance intake and resource allocation. Our approach is to use radioisotope tracing techniques to study whole-plant and plant organ (e.g., leaves,more » stems, roots) dynamical responses to abrupt changes in environmental conditions such as concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere, nutrient availability and lighting. To this aim we are collaborating with the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory Facility (JLab) to develop gamma-ray and beta particle imaging systems optimized for plant studies. The radioisotope tracing measurements are conducted at the Phytotron facility at Duke University. The Phytotron is a controlled environment plant research facility with a variety of plant growth chambers. One chamber is dedicated to radioisotope labeling measurements. All measurements for this project were carried out in that specially equipped chamber. The radioisotopes used in this project were produced in the tandem accelerator laboratory operated by the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The target room where the isotopes are produced is located about 100 m from the Phytotron facility. The radioactive substances produced in the tandem laboratory are transported to the Phytotron through underground conduits that run between the two buildings.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
  2. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1244531
Report Number(s):
DOE-DUKE-05057
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0005057
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Howell, Calvin R., Reid, Chantal D., and Weisenberger, Andrew G.. Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1244531.
Howell, Calvin R., Reid, Chantal D., & Weisenberger, Andrew G.. Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1244531.
Howell, Calvin R., Reid, Chantal D., and Weisenberger, Andrew G.. Wed . "Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1244531. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1244531.
@article{osti_1244531,
title = {Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems},
author = {Howell, Calvin R. and Reid, Chantal D. and Weisenberger, Andrew G.},
abstractNote = {The main objective of this project is to develop technologies and experimental techniques for studying the dynamics of physiological responses of plants to changes in their interface with the local environment and to educate a new generation of scientists in an interdisciplinary environment of biology, physics and engineering. Also an important goal is to perform measurements to demonstrate the new data that can be produced and made available to the plant-biology community using the imaging technologies and experimental techniques developed in this project. The study of the plant-environment interface includes a wide range of topics in plant physiology, e.g., the root-soil interface, resource availability, impact of herbivores, influence of microbes on root surface, and responses to toxins in the air and soil. The initial scientific motivation for our work is to improve understanding of the mechanisms for physiological responses to abrupt changes in the local environment, in particular, the responses that result in short-term adjustments in resource (e.g., sugars, nutrients and water) allocations. Data of time-dependent responses of plants to environmental changes are essential in developing mechanistic models for substance intake and resource allocation. Our approach is to use radioisotope tracing techniques to study whole-plant and plant organ (e.g., leaves, stems, roots) dynamical responses to abrupt changes in environmental conditions such as concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, nutrient availability and lighting. To this aim we are collaborating with the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory Facility (JLab) to develop gamma-ray and beta particle imaging systems optimized for plant studies. The radioisotope tracing measurements are conducted at the Phytotron facility at Duke University. The Phytotron is a controlled environment plant research facility with a variety of plant growth chambers. One chamber is dedicated to radioisotope labeling measurements. All measurements for this project were carried out in that specially equipped chamber. The radioisotopes used in this project were produced in the tandem accelerator laboratory operated by the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The target room where the isotopes are produced is located about 100 m from the Phytotron facility. The radioactive substances produced in the tandem laboratory are transported to the Phytotron through underground conduits that run between the two buildings.},
doi = {10.2172/1244531},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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