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Title: Measuring the Scatter of the Mass–Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function

Abstract

The knowledge of the scatter in the mass-observable relation is a key ingredient for a cosmological analysis based on galaxy clusters in a photometric survey. We demonstrate here how the linear bias measured in the correlation function for clusters can be used to determine the value of the scatter. The new method is tested in simulations of a 5.000 square degrees optical survey up to z~1, similar to the ongoing Dark Energy Survey. The results indicate that the scatter can be measured with a precision of 5% using this technique.

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1244516
Report Number(s):
arXiv:1512.01468; FERMILAB-PUB-15-615-AE
Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357; 1408278
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: The Astrophysical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 836; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Campa, Julia, Estrada, Juan, and Flaugher, Brenna. Measuring the Scatter of the Mass–Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/9.
Campa, Julia, Estrada, Juan, & Flaugher, Brenna. Measuring the Scatter of the Mass–Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/9.
Campa, Julia, Estrada, Juan, and Flaugher, Brenna. Fri . "Measuring the Scatter of the Mass–Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/9. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1244516.
@article{osti_1244516,
title = {Measuring the Scatter of the Mass–Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function},
author = {Campa, Julia and Estrada, Juan and Flaugher, Brenna},
abstractNote = {The knowledge of the scatter in the mass-observable relation is a key ingredient for a cosmological analysis based on galaxy clusters in a photometric survey. We demonstrate here how the linear bias measured in the correlation function for clusters can be used to determine the value of the scatter. The new method is tested in simulations of a 5.000 square degrees optical survey up to z~1, similar to the ongoing Dark Energy Survey. The results indicate that the scatter can be measured with a precision of 5% using this technique.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/836/1/9},
journal = {The Astrophysical Journal (Online)},
number = 1,
volume = 836,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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