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Title: Communication practices about HPV testing among providers in Federally Qualified Health Centers

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1241927
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Preventive Medicine Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-02-27 17:35:02; Journal ID: ISSN 2211-3355
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lin, Lavinia, Benard, Vicki B., Greek, April, Roland, Katherine B., Hawkins, Nikki A., and Saraiya, Mona. Communication practices about HPV testing among providers in Federally Qualified Health Centers. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.05.006.
Lin, Lavinia, Benard, Vicki B., Greek, April, Roland, Katherine B., Hawkins, Nikki A., & Saraiya, Mona. Communication practices about HPV testing among providers in Federally Qualified Health Centers. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.05.006.
Lin, Lavinia, Benard, Vicki B., Greek, April, Roland, Katherine B., Hawkins, Nikki A., and Saraiya, Mona. Thu . "Communication practices about HPV testing among providers in Federally Qualified Health Centers". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.05.006.
@article{osti_1241927,
title = {Communication practices about HPV testing among providers in Federally Qualified Health Centers},
author = {Lin, Lavinia and Benard, Vicki B. and Greek, April and Roland, Katherine B. and Hawkins, Nikki A. and Saraiya, Mona},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.05.006},
journal = {Preventive Medicine Reports},
number = C,
volume = 2,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.05.006

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