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Title: Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?

Abstract

We prepared higher surface area nickel phosphides than are normally found by reducing nickel phosphate. To do this, we hydrothermally synthesized Ni hydroxy phosphite precursors with low levels of molybdenum substitution. The molybdenum substitution increases the surface area of these precursors. During pretreatment in a sulfiding atmosphere (such as H2S/H2) dispersed islands of MoS2 segregate from the precursor and provide a pathway for H2 dissociation that allows reduction of the phosphite precursor to nickel phosphide at substantially lower temperatures than in the absence of MoS2. The results reported here show that to create nickel phosphides with comparable activity to conventional supported sulfide catalysts, one would have to synthesize the phosphide with surface areas exceeding 400 m2/g (i.e. with nanoparticles less than 30 Å in lateral dimension).

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1240294
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Catalysis Today; Journal Volume: 246
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Hydrothermal; Hydrotreating; Nickel hydroxy phosphite; Nickel phosphide

Citation Formats

Soled, S., Miseo, S., Baumgartner, J., Guzman, J., Bolin, T., and Meyer, R. Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cattod.2014.05.049.
Soled, S., Miseo, S., Baumgartner, J., Guzman, J., Bolin, T., & Meyer, R. Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cattod.2014.05.049.
Soled, S., Miseo, S., Baumgartner, J., Guzman, J., Bolin, T., and Meyer, R. 2015. "Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cattod.2014.05.049.
@article{osti_1240294,
title = {Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?},
author = {Soled, S. and Miseo, S. and Baumgartner, J. and Guzman, J. and Bolin, T. and Meyer, R.},
abstractNote = {We prepared higher surface area nickel phosphides than are normally found by reducing nickel phosphate. To do this, we hydrothermally synthesized Ni hydroxy phosphite precursors with low levels of molybdenum substitution. The molybdenum substitution increases the surface area of these precursors. During pretreatment in a sulfiding atmosphere (such as H2S/H2) dispersed islands of MoS2 segregate from the precursor and provide a pathway for H2 dissociation that allows reduction of the phosphite precursor to nickel phosphide at substantially lower temperatures than in the absence of MoS2. The results reported here show that to create nickel phosphides with comparable activity to conventional supported sulfide catalysts, one would have to synthesize the phosphide with surface areas exceeding 400 m2/g (i.e. with nanoparticles less than 30 Å in lateral dimension).},
doi = {10.1016/j.cattod.2014.05.049},
journal = {Catalysis Today},
number = ,
volume = 246,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 5
}
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