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Title: Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid

Abstract

Optimization of colloidal nanoparticle synthesis techniques requires an understanding of underlying particle growth mechanisms. Non-classical growth mechanisms are particularly important as they affect nanoparticle size and shape distributions which in turn influence functional properties. For example, preferential attachment of nanoparticles is known to lead to the formation of mesocrystals, although the formation mechanism is currently not well understood. Here we employ in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to demonstrate that the experimentally observed preference for end-to-end attachment of silver nanorods is a result of weaker solvation forces occurring at rod ends. SMD reveals that when the side of a nanorod approaches another rod, perturbation in the surface bound water at the nanorod surface creates significant energy barriers to attachment. Additionally, rod morphology (i.e. facet shape) effects can explain the majority of the side attachment effects that are observed experimentally.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1240222
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-108882
Journal ID: ISSN 1936-0851; 48583; 47296
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
ACS Nano
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1936-0851
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
molecular dynamics; simulation; single particle tracking; in situ microscopy; silver; nanorod; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Welch, David A., Woehl, Taylor J., Park, Chiwoo, Faller, Roland, Evans, James E., and Browning, Nigel D. Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acsnano.5b06632.
Welch, David A., Woehl, Taylor J., Park, Chiwoo, Faller, Roland, Evans, James E., & Browning, Nigel D. Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid. United States. doi:10.1021/acsnano.5b06632.
Welch, David A., Woehl, Taylor J., Park, Chiwoo, Faller, Roland, Evans, James E., and Browning, Nigel D. Wed . "Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid". United States. doi:10.1021/acsnano.5b06632.
@article{osti_1240222,
title = {Understanding the Role of Solvation Forces on the Preferential Attachment of Nanoparticles in Liquid},
author = {Welch, David A. and Woehl, Taylor J. and Park, Chiwoo and Faller, Roland and Evans, James E. and Browning, Nigel D.},
abstractNote = {Optimization of colloidal nanoparticle synthesis techniques requires an understanding of underlying particle growth mechanisms. Non-classical growth mechanisms are particularly important as they affect nanoparticle size and shape distributions which in turn influence functional properties. For example, preferential attachment of nanoparticles is known to lead to the formation of mesocrystals, although the formation mechanism is currently not well understood. Here we employ in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to demonstrate that the experimentally observed preference for end-to-end attachment of silver nanorods is a result of weaker solvation forces occurring at rod ends. SMD reveals that when the side of a nanorod approaches another rod, perturbation in the surface bound water at the nanorod surface creates significant energy barriers to attachment. Additionally, rod morphology (i.e. facet shape) effects can explain the majority of the side attachment effects that are observed experimentally.},
doi = {10.1021/acsnano.5b06632},
journal = {ACS Nano},
issn = {1936-0851},
number = 1,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {1}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

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journal, January 2019

  • Hufschmid, Ryan; Teeman, Eric; Mehdi, B. Layla
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