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Title: Phase transformations in steels: Processing, microstructure, and performance

Abstract

In this study, contemporary steel research is revealing new processing avenues to tailor microstructure and properties that, until recently, were only imaginable. Much of the technological versatility facilitating this development is provided by the understanding and utilization of the complex phase transformation sequences available in ferrous alloys. Today we have the opportunity to explore the diverse phenomena displayed by steels with specialized analytical and experimental tools. Advances in multi-scale characterization techniques provide a fresh perspective into microstructural relationships at the macro- and micro-scale, enabling a fundamental understanding of the role of phase transformations during processing and subsequent deformation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1238662
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-14-20883
Journal ID: ISSN 1047-4838; PII: 910
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 66; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-4838
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; phase transformations

Citation Formats

Gibbs, Paul J. Phase transformations in steels: Processing, microstructure, and performance. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1007/s11837-014-0910-6.
Gibbs, Paul J. Phase transformations in steels: Processing, microstructure, and performance. United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-014-0910-6.
Gibbs, Paul J. Thu . "Phase transformations in steels: Processing, microstructure, and performance". United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-014-0910-6. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1238662.
@article{osti_1238662,
title = {Phase transformations in steels: Processing, microstructure, and performance},
author = {Gibbs, Paul J.},
abstractNote = {In this study, contemporary steel research is revealing new processing avenues to tailor microstructure and properties that, until recently, were only imaginable. Much of the technological versatility facilitating this development is provided by the understanding and utilization of the complex phase transformation sequences available in ferrous alloys. Today we have the opportunity to explore the diverse phenomena displayed by steels with specialized analytical and experimental tools. Advances in multi-scale characterization techniques provide a fresh perspective into microstructural relationships at the macro- and micro-scale, enabling a fundamental understanding of the role of phase transformations during processing and subsequent deformation.},
doi = {10.1007/s11837-014-0910-6},
journal = {Journal of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society},
number = 5,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Journal Article:
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