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Title: TOWARDS REAL TIME EPIDEMIOLOGY: DATA ASSIMILATION, MODELING AND ANOMALY DETECTION OF HEALTH SURVEILLANCE DATA STREAMS

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1237261
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-1556
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: NSF WORKSHOP ON BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS AND CASE STUDIES ; 200705 ; NEW BRUNSWICK
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

BETTENCOURT, LUIS, RIBEIRO, RUY, and CHOWELL, GERARDO. TOWARDS REAL TIME EPIDEMIOLOGY: DATA ASSIMILATION, MODELING AND ANOMALY DETECTION OF HEALTH SURVEILLANCE DATA STREAMS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
BETTENCOURT, LUIS, RIBEIRO, RUY, & CHOWELL, GERARDO. TOWARDS REAL TIME EPIDEMIOLOGY: DATA ASSIMILATION, MODELING AND ANOMALY DETECTION OF HEALTH SURVEILLANCE DATA STREAMS. United States.
BETTENCOURT, LUIS, RIBEIRO, RUY, and CHOWELL, GERARDO. Thu . "TOWARDS REAL TIME EPIDEMIOLOGY: DATA ASSIMILATION, MODELING AND ANOMALY DETECTION OF HEALTH SURVEILLANCE DATA STREAMS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1237261.
@article{osti_1237261,
title = {TOWARDS REAL TIME EPIDEMIOLOGY: DATA ASSIMILATION, MODELING AND ANOMALY DETECTION OF HEALTH SURVEILLANCE DATA STREAMS},
author = {BETTENCOURT, LUIS and RIBEIRO, RUY and CHOWELL, GERARDO},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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