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Title: Structural Studies of a Double-Stranded RNA from Trypanosome RNA Editing by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1236251
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: RNA-RNA Interactions
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Criswell, Angela, and Mooers, Blaine H.M. Structural Studies of a Double-Stranded RNA from Trypanosome RNA Editing by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-1896-6_13.
Criswell, Angela, & Mooers, Blaine H.M. Structural Studies of a Double-Stranded RNA from Trypanosome RNA Editing by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. United States. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-1896-6_13.
Criswell, Angela, and Mooers, Blaine H.M. Mon . "Structural Studies of a Double-Stranded RNA from Trypanosome RNA Editing by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering". United States. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-1896-6_13.
@article{osti_1236251,
title = {Structural Studies of a Double-Stranded RNA from Trypanosome RNA Editing by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering},
author = {Criswell, Angela and Mooers, Blaine H.M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/978-1-4939-1896-6_13},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Mon Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

Book:
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