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Title: Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards

Abstract

Modern mass spectrometry and separation techniques have made measurement of major uranium isotope ratios a routine task; however accurate and precise measurement of the minor uranium isotopes remains a challenge as sample size decreases. One particular challenge is the presence of isobaric interferences and their impact on the accuracy of minor isotope 234U and 236U measurements. Furthermore, we present techniques used for routine U isotopic analysis of environmental nuclear safeguards samples and evaluate polyatomic interferences that negatively impact accuracy as well as methods to mitigate their impacts.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1235924
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-15-22473
Journal ID: ISSN 0236-5731; PII: 4419
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry; Journal ID: ISSN 0236-5731
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS); environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards; interferences; uranium isotopes; polyatomic interferences

Citation Formats

Pollington, Anthony D., Kinman, William S., Hanson, Susan K., and Steiner, Robert E.. Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1007/s10967-015-4419-4.
Pollington, Anthony D., Kinman, William S., Hanson, Susan K., & Steiner, Robert E.. Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards. United States. doi:10.1007/s10967-015-4419-4.
Pollington, Anthony D., Kinman, William S., Hanson, Susan K., and Steiner, Robert E.. Fri . "Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards". United States. doi:10.1007/s10967-015-4419-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1235924.
@article{osti_1235924,
title = {Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards},
author = {Pollington, Anthony D. and Kinman, William S. and Hanson, Susan K. and Steiner, Robert E.},
abstractNote = {Modern mass spectrometry and separation techniques have made measurement of major uranium isotope ratios a routine task; however accurate and precise measurement of the minor uranium isotopes remains a challenge as sample size decreases. One particular challenge is the presence of isobaric interferences and their impact on the accuracy of minor isotope 234U and 236U measurements. Furthermore, we present techniques used for routine U isotopic analysis of environmental nuclear safeguards samples and evaluate polyatomic interferences that negatively impact accuracy as well as methods to mitigate their impacts.},
doi = {10.1007/s10967-015-4419-4},
journal = {Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 04 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Fri Sep 04 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6works
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  • A method for the separation and determination of total and isotopic uranium and plutonium by ICP-MS was developed for IAEA samples on cellulose-based media. Preparation of the IAEA samples involved a series of redox chemistries and separations using TRU® resin (Eichrom). The sample introduction system, an APEX nebulizer (Elemental Scientific, Inc), provided enhanced nebulization for a several-fold increase in sensitivity and reduction in background. Application of mass bias (ALPHA) correction factors greatly improved the precision of the data. By combining the enhancements of chemical separation, instrumentation and data processing, detection levels for uranium and plutonium approached high attogram levels.
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