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Title: Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

Abstract

To completely understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Engineering Innovation
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division
  3. Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1234990
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02- 05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ultramicroscopy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 151; Journal ID: ISSN 0304-3991
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); Annular dark-field (ADF); Atomic-depth resolution imaging; Surface imaging

Citation Formats

Ishikawa, Ryo, Lupini, Andrew R., Hinuma, Yoyo, and Pennycook, Stephen. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.009.
Ishikawa, Ryo, Lupini, Andrew R., Hinuma, Yoyo, & Pennycook, Stephen. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.009.
Ishikawa, Ryo, Lupini, Andrew R., Hinuma, Yoyo, and Pennycook, Stephen. 2014. "Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.009. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1234990.
@article{osti_1234990,
title = {Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging},
author = {Ishikawa, Ryo and Lupini, Andrew R. and Hinuma, Yoyo and Pennycook, Stephen},
abstractNote = {To completely understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2014.11.009},
journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
number = ,
volume = 151,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 8works
Citation information provided by
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