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Title: Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

Abstract

In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and highmore » resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct and quantitative comparisons between experimental measurements and simulation show that the proposed model accurately captures plasticity in deformation of polycrystalline tantalum.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1234811
Report Number(s):
SAND-2015-10859
617619
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Lim, Hojun, Battaile, Corbett Chandler., Carroll, Jay, Buchheit, Thomas E., Boyce, Brad, and Weinberger, Christopher. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1234811.
Lim, Hojun, Battaile, Corbett Chandler., Carroll, Jay, Buchheit, Thomas E., Boyce, Brad, & Weinberger, Christopher. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.. United States. doi:10.2172/1234811.
Lim, Hojun, Battaile, Corbett Chandler., Carroll, Jay, Buchheit, Thomas E., Boyce, Brad, and Weinberger, Christopher. 2015. "Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.". United States. doi:10.2172/1234811. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1234811.
@article{osti_1234811,
title = {Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.},
author = {Lim, Hojun and Battaile, Corbett Chandler. and Carroll, Jay and Buchheit, Thomas E. and Boyce, Brad and Weinberger, Christopher},
abstractNote = {In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct and quantitative comparisons between experimental measurements and simulation show that the proposed model accurately captures plasticity in deformation of polycrystalline tantalum.},
doi = {10.2172/1234811},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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