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Title: Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO 2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

Abstract

In order to advance the understanding of the patterns and controls on the carbon budget in the Arctic region, San Diego State University has maintained eddy covariance flux towers at three sites in Arctic Alaska, starting in 1997.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
San Diego State University Research Foundation, San Diego, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1233182
Report Number(s):
DOE-SDSURF-05160
DOE Contract Number:
SC0005160
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Oechel, Walter, and Kalhori, Aram. Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1233182.
Oechel, Walter, & Kalhori, Aram. Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska. United States. doi:10.2172/1233182.
Oechel, Walter, and Kalhori, Aram. 2015. "Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska". United States. doi:10.2172/1233182. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1233182.
@article{osti_1233182,
title = {Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska},
author = {Oechel, Walter and Kalhori, Aram},
abstractNote = {In order to advance the understanding of the patterns and controls on the carbon budget in the Arctic region, San Diego State University has maintained eddy covariance flux towers at three sites in Arctic Alaska, starting in 1997.},
doi = {10.2172/1233182},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • Seasonal snow is present on the Arctic Slope of Alaska for nine months each year. Its presence or absence determines whether 80% of the solar radiation is reflected or absorbed, respectively. Although life on the Arctic Slope is adapted to, and in some cases dependent upon seasonal snow, little is known about it from a scientific point of view. Its quantity has been grossly underestimated, and knowledge of its distribution and the extent of wind transport and redistribution is very limited. This research project dealt with the amount, regional distribution and physical properties of wind blown snow and its biologicalmore » role in the R4D area of the Arctic Slope. Physical processes which operate within the snow that were studied included the flux of heat and vapor and the fractionation of stable isotopes through it during fall and winter, and the complex heat and mass transfer within the snow and between snow, its substrate and the overlying atmosphere during the melt period.« less
  • This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska`s Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R{sub 4}D project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.
  • This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska`s Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R{sub 4}D project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.more » The 1984--1985, 1985--1986 and 1986--1987 seasonal snow was measured to determine its total quantity, its physical structure and its distribution as a function of wind and topography. Observations of meteorological parameters and snowpack characteristics during winter and spring have yielded information on the seasonal evolution of the snow in quantitative terms. A method of determining melt rates over large regions was developed and is being refined, progress was made on a model describing energy flux sources which control snow melting. A strong control is exerted by air mass advection on a broad scale. We are continuing to devote attention to the sources of energy and energy transfer mechanisms which control snow melt. The 1986 snow melt was two weeks later than the 1987 and 1985 meltouts. The delay was caused by advection of cold air from the Arctic Ocean. When it did get underway melting was very rapid and the snow pack disappeared in only half the time taken in 1985.« less
  • This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska`s Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R{sub 4}D project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.
  • This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska`s Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R40 project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination Of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.