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Title: XTL Converter

Abstract

"XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Header information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1232452
Report Number(s):
XTL CONVERTER; 003753MLTPL00
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
003753
Software Package Contents:
Open Source Software package available from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the following URL: https://github.com/stevenspurgeon/xtl-converter
Software CPU:
MLTPL
Open Source:
Yes
Source Code Available:
Yes
Related Software:
muSTEM.pdf
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Spurgeon, Steven R. XTL Converter. Computer software. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232452. Vers. 00. USDOE. 7 Oct. 2015. Web.
Spurgeon, Steven R. (2015, October 7). XTL Converter (Version 00) [Computer software]. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232452.
Spurgeon, Steven R. XTL Converter. Computer software. Version 00. October 7, 2015. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232452.
@misc{osti_1232452,
title = {XTL Converter, Version 00},
author = {Spurgeon, Steven R},
abstractNote = {"XTL Converter" is a short Python script for electron microscopy simulation. The program takes an input crystal file in the VESTA *.XTL format and converts it to a text format readable by the multislice simulation program ìSTEM. The process of converting a crystal *.XTL file to the format used by the ìSTEM simulation program is quite tedious; it generally requires the user to select dozens or hundreds of atoms, rearranging and reformatting their position. Header information must also be reformatted to a specific style to be read by ìSTEM. "XTL Converter" simplifies this process, saving the user time and allowing for easy batch processing of crystals.},
url = {https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1232452},
doi = {},
year = {Wed Oct 07 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Wed Oct 07 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
note =
}

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