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Title: High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

Abstract

This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE - Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE)
OSTI Identifier:
1231425
Report Number(s):
HIGH-BAY LECM; 002623IBMPC00
SWR/10-06
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
002623
Software Package Contents:
ALL DISTRIBUTION WILL BE HANDLED BY NATIIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY (NREL)
Software CPU:
IBMPC
Open Source:
No
Source Code Available:
Yes
Related Software:
Microsoft Office, Excel
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures. Computer software. Vers. 00. USDOE; USDOE - Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). 31 Dec. 2010. Web.
Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean. (2010, December 31). High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures (Version 00) [Computer software].
Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures. Computer software. Version 00. December 31, 2010.
@misc{osti_1231425,
title = {High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures, Version 00},
author = {Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean},
abstractNote = {This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.},
doi = {},
year = 2010,
month = ,
note =
}

Software:
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  • This software requires inputs of simple low-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Low-wattage T8 lighting retrofit, T12 to T8 lighting retrofit, LED Exit signs retrofit, Occupancy sensors, Screw-in lighting retrofit, and central lighting controls. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cooling load reduction, heating load increases, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: Simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.
  • A thermographic audit of a Pawtucket, Rhode Island high school is reported. Conducted with the aid of an infrared camera system, this thermographic study located heat losses not evident to the naked eye. Heat losses were documented and the thermograms analyzed to obtain complete knowledge of the location of all heat losses from the building complex. Each thermogram showed one or more types of heat loss together with the specific section of the building where it occurred. Priorities were assigned to various retrofit processes and a thermographic inspection conducted after retrofitting to confirm its efficacy. The study comprised an analysismore » and recommendations of heat loss and heating system appraisals plus an analysis of roof moisture inspection. Numerous thermograms illustrate the report.« less
  • A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption modelsmore » and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The average measured pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption was 1664 kWh/year ($119/year). Ten percent of the houses used less than 250 kWh/year, while another 10% used more than 3000 kWh/year. An average reduction in air-conditioning electricity consumption of 535 kWh/year ($38/year and 28% of pre-weatherization consumption) was obtained from replacement of one low-efficiency window air conditioner (EER less than 7.0) per house with a high-efficiency unit (EER greater than 9.0). For approximately the same cost, savings tripled to 1503 kWh/year ($107/year and 41% of pre-weatherization consumption) in those houses with initial air-conditioning electricity consumption greater than 2750 kWh/year. For these houses, replacement of a low-efficiency air conditioner with a high-efficiency unit was cost effective using the incremental cost of installing a new unit now rather than later; the average installation cost for these houses under a weatherization program was estimated to be $786. The general replacement of low-efficiency air conditioners (replacing units in all houses without considering pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption) was not cost effective in the test houses. ECMs installed under the Oklahoma WAP and installed in combination with an attic radiant barrier did not produce air-conditioning electricity savings that could be measured in the field test. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this type of housing.« less
  • A cooperative field test was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to determine the space-cooling electricity consumption of low-income homes equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in consumption due to energy conservation measures (ECMs) installed under Oklahoma's Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the additional reduction due to two ECMs designed to reduce space-cooling electricity consumption: attic radiant barriers and replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high efficiency units. Eighty-one single-family, owner-occupied houses were divided into a control group and three treatment groups: ECMs performed under Oklahoma's WAP, WAP ECMs plus a truss-mounted attic radiant barrier, and WAP ECMs plus amore » high-efficiency window air-conditioner to replace a less efficient unit. Pre-weatherization data were collected during the summer of 1988 and post-weatherization data were collected the following summer. Air-conditioning electricity consumptions and indoor temperatures were monitored weekly. Air-conditioning energy use models and regression analyses were employed to normalize annual space-cooling electricity consumptions and savings to average outdoor temperatures and pre-weatherization indoor temperatures. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption modelsmore » and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.« less

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