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Title: Study of insulator mortars. Part 1: Comparative analysis of the freeze-thaw durability of cement grouts and mortars in line and sub-station porcelain insulators

Abstract

As part of a major study being conducted on the durability of insulators in transmission lines and sub-station equipment comprising insulating components, seven Hydro-Quebec suppliers have contributed a number of samples made from the cement grouts and mortars used in manufacturing their equipment. The manufacturers` samples and those made in house were tested in the laboratory for compressive, tensile and flexural strength, as well as freezing and thawing, shrinkage/expansion to wetting and drying, autoclave expansion and carbonation. This paper presents the results of the freeze-thaw tests that consisted in determining changes in mass and length, uniaxial compressive strength, and tensile and flexural strength. The freeze-thaw test was conducted according to ASTM Test Method C666(B), which was used to determine the resistance of concrete specimens to rapidly repeated cycles of freezing and thawing (freezing in air at {minus}18 C and thawing in water at 4 C, 3-h cycles, 530 cycles in total). Two specific trends were noted: (1) eleven series of prisms showed less than 0.055% linear expansion after 530 freeze-thaw cycles, and (2) eight series of prisms showed more than 0.200% linear expansion. Two definite trends also emerged regarding changes in mass: (1) twelve series of prisms showed little changemore » in mass after 530 freeze-thaw cycles and (2) seven series of prisms registered substantial changes in mass, in some cases over 10%. An analysis of the test results for compressive, tensile and flexural strengths showed that the specimens exhibiting little increase in expansion and loss of mass had an increase in mechanical resistance during the freeze-thaw test, while the opposite was true for specimens that showed considerable linear expansion and loss of mass, i.e. their compressive, tensile and flexural strengths decreased during the freeze-thaw test.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
122783
Report Number(s):
CONF-950521-
ISBN 1-56676-313-4; TRN: IM9547%%364
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: ENERCOMP 95: international conference on composite materials and energy, Montreal (Canada), 8-10 May 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of International conference on composite materials and energy: Proceedings. Enercomp 95; PB: 1080 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUBSTATIONS; ELECTRICAL INSULATORS; POWER TRANSMISSION LINES; GROUTING; MORTARS; MATERIALS TESTING; FREEZING; THAWING; COMPRESSION STRENGTH; TENSILE PROPERTIES; FLEXURAL STRENGTH; EXPANSION; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Durand, B. Study of insulator mortars. Part 1: Comparative analysis of the freeze-thaw durability of cement grouts and mortars in line and sub-station porcelain insulators. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Durand, B. Study of insulator mortars. Part 1: Comparative analysis of the freeze-thaw durability of cement grouts and mortars in line and sub-station porcelain insulators. United States.
Durand, B. Wed . "Study of insulator mortars. Part 1: Comparative analysis of the freeze-thaw durability of cement grouts and mortars in line and sub-station porcelain insulators". United States.
@article{osti_122783,
title = {Study of insulator mortars. Part 1: Comparative analysis of the freeze-thaw durability of cement grouts and mortars in line and sub-station porcelain insulators},
author = {Durand, B},
abstractNote = {As part of a major study being conducted on the durability of insulators in transmission lines and sub-station equipment comprising insulating components, seven Hydro-Quebec suppliers have contributed a number of samples made from the cement grouts and mortars used in manufacturing their equipment. The manufacturers` samples and those made in house were tested in the laboratory for compressive, tensile and flexural strength, as well as freezing and thawing, shrinkage/expansion to wetting and drying, autoclave expansion and carbonation. This paper presents the results of the freeze-thaw tests that consisted in determining changes in mass and length, uniaxial compressive strength, and tensile and flexural strength. The freeze-thaw test was conducted according to ASTM Test Method C666(B), which was used to determine the resistance of concrete specimens to rapidly repeated cycles of freezing and thawing (freezing in air at {minus}18 C and thawing in water at 4 C, 3-h cycles, 530 cycles in total). Two specific trends were noted: (1) eleven series of prisms showed less than 0.055% linear expansion after 530 freeze-thaw cycles, and (2) eight series of prisms showed more than 0.200% linear expansion. Two definite trends also emerged regarding changes in mass: (1) twelve series of prisms showed little change in mass after 530 freeze-thaw cycles and (2) seven series of prisms registered substantial changes in mass, in some cases over 10%. An analysis of the test results for compressive, tensile and flexural strengths showed that the specimens exhibiting little increase in expansion and loss of mass had an increase in mechanical resistance during the freeze-thaw test, while the opposite was true for specimens that showed considerable linear expansion and loss of mass, i.e. their compressive, tensile and flexural strengths decreased during the freeze-thaw test.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {11}
}

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