skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment

Abstract

The DAMIC (DArk Matter In CCDs) experiment uses high-resistivity, scientific-grade CCDs to search for dark matter. The CCD’s low electronic noise allows an unprecedently low energy threshold of a few tens of eV; this characteristic makes it possible to detect silicon recoils resulting from interactions of low-mass WIMPs. In addition, the CCD’s high spatial resolution and the excellent energy response results in very effective background identification techniques. The experiment has a unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV/c 2. Previous results have motivated the construction of DAMIC100, a 100 grams silicon target detector currently being installed at SNOLAB. The mode of operation and unique imaging capabilities of the CCDs, and how they may be exploited to characterize and suppress backgrounds are discussed, as well as physics results after one year of data taking.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). et al
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1226334
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-15-450-AE-CD-PPD
arXiv eprint number arXiv:1510.02126; TRN: US1700239
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 34. International Cosmic Ray Conference, The Hague, NL (United States), 30 Jul - 6 Aug 2015
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; SILICON; MASS; WIMPS; GEV RANGE 01-10; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; INTERACTIONS; OPERATION; RECOILS; SENSITIVITY; IMAGES; BACKGROUND RADIATION; SI SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS

Citation Formats

de Mello Neto, J. R.T.. The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
de Mello Neto, J. R.T.. The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment. United States.
de Mello Neto, J. R.T.. 2015. "The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1226334.
@article{osti_1226334,
title = {The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment},
author = {de Mello Neto, J. R.T.},
abstractNote = {The DAMIC (DArk Matter In CCDs) experiment uses high-resistivity, scientific-grade CCDs to search for dark matter. The CCD’s low electronic noise allows an unprecedently low energy threshold of a few tens of eV; this characteristic makes it possible to detect silicon recoils resulting from interactions of low-mass WIMPs. In addition, the CCD’s high spatial resolution and the excellent energy response results in very effective background identification techniques. The experiment has a unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV/c2. Previous results have motivated the construction of DAMIC100, a 100 grams silicon target detector currently being installed at SNOLAB. The mode of operation and unique imaging capabilities of the CCDs, and how they may be exploited to characterize and suppress backgrounds are discussed, as well as physics results after one year of data taking.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The DAMIC experiment uses fully depleted, high resistivity CCDs to search for dark matter particles. With an energy thresholdmore » $$\sim$$50 eV$$_{ee}$$, and excellent energy and spatial resolutions, the DAMIC CCDs are well-suited to identify and suppress radioactive backgrounds, having an unrivaled sensitivity to WIMPs with masses $<$6 GeV/$c^2$. Early results motivated the construction of a 100 g detector, DAMIC100, currently being installed at SNOLAB. This contribution discusses the installation progress, new calibration efforts near the threshold, a preliminary result with 2014 data, and the prospects for physics results after one year of data taking.« less
  • DAMIC (Dark Matter in CCDs) is a novel dark matter experiment that has unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV. Due to its low electronic readout noise (R.M.S. ~3 e-) this instrument is able to reach a detection threshold below 0.5 keV nuclear recoil energy, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses possible. We report on early results and experience gained from a detector that has been running at SNOLAB from Dec 2012. We also discuss the measured and expected backgrounds and present the plan for future detectors to be installed in 2014.
  • We present direct detection constraints on the absorption of hidden-photon dark matter with particle masses in the range 1.2-30 eVmore » $$c^{-2}$$ with the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB. Under the assumption that the local dark matter is entirely constituted of hidden photons, the sensitivity to the kinetic mixing parameter $$\kappa$$ is competitive with constraints from solar emission, reaching a minimum value of 2.2$$\times$$$10^{-14}$$ at 17 eV$$c^{-2}$$. These results are the most stringent direct detection constraints on hidden-photon dark matter with masses 3-12 eV$$c^{-2}$$ and the first demonstration of direct experimental sensitivity to ionization signals $<$12 eV from dark matter interactions.« less
  • The DarkSide-50 experiment, located at the “Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN)”, is based on low-radioactivity argon double phase time projection chamber, surrounded by an active liquid scintillator veto, designed for the zero background achievement. The liquid argon features sufficient self shielding and easy scalability to multi-tons scale. The impressive reduction of the 39Ar isotope (compared to the atmospheric argon), along with the excellent pulse shape discrimination, make this technology a possible candidate for the forthcoming generation of multi-ton Dark Matter experiments.