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Title: Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1225501
Report Number(s):
NREL/SR-5500-64316; DOE/GO-102015-4686
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; residential; Residential Buildings; PARR; Building America; radon; air sealing; sealing ducts; foundation; blower door; zone pressure; add-a-hole; moisture balance

Citation Formats

Rose, William B., Francisco, Paul W., and Merrin, Zachary. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1225501.
Rose, William B., Francisco, Paul W., & Merrin, Zachary. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study. United States. doi:10.2172/1225501.
Rose, William B., Francisco, Paul W., and Merrin, Zachary. 2015. "Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study". United States. doi:10.2172/1225501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1225501.
@article{osti_1225501,
title = {Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study},
author = {Rose, William B. and Francisco, Paul W. and Merrin, Zachary},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.},
doi = {10.2172/1225501},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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