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Title: Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor

Abstract

As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10 -6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1224950
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CR-7128
118704; TRN: US1500838
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; AUSTENITIC STEELS; ATOMIC DISPLACEMENTS; NICKEL ALLOYS; SCREW DISLOCATIONS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; PRECIPITATION; SWELLING; IRRADIATION; MICROSTRUCTURE; VOIDS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; REACTOR CORES; RADIATION DOSES; NEUTRON FLUENCE; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K

Citation Formats

Chen, Y., Yang, Yong, Huang, Yina, Allen, T., Alexandreanu, B., and Natesan, K. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1224950.
Chen, Y., Yang, Yong, Huang, Yina, Allen, T., Alexandreanu, B., & Natesan, K. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor. United States. doi:10.2172/1224950.
Chen, Y., Yang, Yong, Huang, Yina, Allen, T., Alexandreanu, B., and Natesan, K. Thu . "Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor". United States. doi:10.2172/1224950. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1224950.
@article{osti_1224950,
title = {Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor},
author = {Chen, Y. and Yang, Yong and Huang, Yina and Allen, T. and Alexandreanu, B. and Natesan, K.},
abstractNote = {As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10-6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.},
doi = {10.2172/1224950},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}

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