skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Advanced CO 2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies

Abstract

This research project addresses one of the goals of the DOE Carbon Sequestration Program (CSP). The CSP core R&D effort is driven by technology and is accomplished through laboratory and pilot scale research aimed at new technologies for greenhouse gas mitigation. Accordingly, this project was directed at developing novel technologies for mitigating unwanted upward leakage of carbon dioxide (CO 2) injected into the subsurface as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. The technology developed by way of this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1224798
DOE Contract Number:
FE0004478
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Spangler, Lee, Cunningham, Alfred, and Phillips, Adrienne. Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1224798.
Spangler, Lee, Cunningham, Alfred, & Phillips, Adrienne. Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies. United States. doi:10.2172/1224798.
Spangler, Lee, Cunningham, Alfred, and Phillips, Adrienne. Tue . "Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies". United States. doi:10.2172/1224798. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1224798.
@article{osti_1224798,
title = {Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies},
author = {Spangler, Lee and Cunningham, Alfred and Phillips, Adrienne},
abstractNote = {This research project addresses one of the goals of the DOE Carbon Sequestration Program (CSP). The CSP core R&D effort is driven by technology and is accomplished through laboratory and pilot scale research aimed at new technologies for greenhouse gas mitigation. Accordingly, this project was directed at developing novel technologies for mitigating unwanted upward leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) injected into the subsurface as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. The technology developed by way of this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP).},
doi = {10.2172/1224798},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Tue Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The technology for CO 2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO 2 EOR) has significantly advanced since the earliest floods were implemented in the 1970s. At least for the Permian Basin region of the U.S., the oil recovery has been now been extended into residual oil zones (ROZs) where the mobile fluid phase is water and immobile phase is oil. But the nature of the formation and fluids within the ROZs has brought some challenges that were not present when flooding the MPZs. The Goldsmith-Landreth project in the Permian Basin was intended to first identify the most pressing issues of the ROZsmore » floods and, secondly, begin to address them with new techniques designed to optimize a flood that commingled the MPZ and the ROZ. The early phase of the research conducted considerable reservoir and fluid characterization work and identified both technical and commercial challenges of producing the enormous quantities of water when flooding the ROZs. It also noted the differing water compositions in the ROZ as compared to the overlying MPZs. A new CO 2 gas lift system using a capillary string was successfully applied during the project which conveyed the CO 2 to the deeper and differing ROZ reservoir conditions at Goldsmith and added a second capillary string that facilitated applying scale inhibitors to mitigate the scaling tendencies of the mixing ROZ and MPZ formation waters. The project also undertook a reservoir modeling effort, using the acquired reservoir characterization data, to history match both the primary and water flood phases of the MPZ and to establish the initial conditions for a modeling effort to forecast response of the ROZ to CO 2 EOR. With the advantage of many profile logs acquired from the operator, some concentration on the original pattern area for the ROZ pilot was accomplished to attempt to perfect the history match for that area. Several optional scenarios for producing the ROZ were simulated seeking to find the preferred mode of producing the two intervals. Finally, the project attempted to document for the first time the production performance of commingled MPZ and ROZ CO 2 EOR project at the nearby Seminole San Andres Unit. The analysis shows that over 10,000 bopd can be shown to be coming from the ROZ interval, a zone that would have produced no oil under primary or water flood phases. A similar analysis was done for the GLSAU project illustrating that 2000 bopd of incremental EOR oil is currently being produced. The results of the modeling work would suggest that 800 bopd can be attributed to the ROZ alone at GLSAU.« less
  • This research project addresses one of the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Storage Program (CSP) aimed at developing Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage. The technology field-tested in this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), which utilizes a biologically-based process to precipitate calcium carbonate. If properly controlled MICP can successfully seal fractures, high permeability zones, and compromised wellbore cement in the vicinity of wellbores and in nearby caprock, thereby improving the storage security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide. This report describes an MICP sealing field test performed onmore » a 24.4 cm (9.625 inch) diameter well located on the Gorgas Steam Generation facility near Jasper, Alabama. The research was aimed at (1) developing methods for delivering MICP promoting fluids downhole using conventional oil field technologies and (2) assessing the ability of MICP to seal cement and formation fractures in the near wellbore region in a sandstone formation. Both objectives were accomplished successfully during a field test performed during the period April 1-11, 2014. The test resulted in complete biomineralization sealing of a horizontal fracture located 340.7 m (1118 feet) below ground surface. A total of 24 calcium injections and six microbial inoculation injections were required over a three day period in order to achieve complete sealing. The fractured region was considered completely sealed when it was no longer possible to inject fluids into the formation without exceeding the initial formation fracture pressure. The test was accomplished using conventional oil field technology including an 11.4 L (3.0 gallon) wireline dump bailer for injecting the biomineralization materials downhole. Metrics indicating successful MICP sealing included reduced injectivity during seal formation, reduction in pressure falloff, and demonstration of MICP by-products including calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) in treated regions of side wall cores. This project successfully integrated mesoscale laboratory experiments at the Center for Biofilm Engineering (CBE) together with simulation modeling conducted at the University of Stuttgart to develop the protocol for conducting the biomineralization sealing test in the field well.« less
  • Over the past decade there has become an increasing worldwide concern about the CO{sub 2} Global Greenhouse Effect. Most of the work on this subject has gone into studying the science of the concentration buildup of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere which includes development and utilization of sophisticated global climate change models for purposes of predicting global temperature changes. However, large uncertainties still exist in attempting to predict the global and regional effects of CO{sub 2} concentration increase in the atmosphere. Until recently, little effort has gone into CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies. This report makes an attempt to review andmore » assess suggested CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies primarily with a view towards reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from the utilization of fossil fuel. A categorization and a technical and economical evaluation of known and advanced CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies are presented. The study is divided into two parts. The first, part A, reviews the mitigation technologies, critiques the status of the technologies and presents economic case studies and comparative evaluations. The second, part B, uses the MARKAL linear energy programming model to determine the least cost mix of technologies to meet the US schedule of energy demands under different levels of CO{sub 2} emissions restrictions. The new CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies were added to the more than 200 energy technologies already in the Markal data base in making this assessment. 23 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.« less
  • The goal of this project was to develop a new CO 2 injection enhanced oil recovery (CO 2-EOR) process using engineered nanoparticles with optimized surface coatings that has better volumetric sweep efficiency and a wider application range than conventional CO 2-EOR processes. The main objectives of this project were to (1) identify the characteristics of the optimal nanoparticles that generate extremely stable CO 2 foams in situ in reservoir regions without oil; (2) develop a novel method of mobility control using “self-guiding” foams with smart nanoparticles; and (3) extend the applicability of the new method to reservoirs having a widemore » range of salinity, temperatures, and heterogeneity. Concurrent with our experimental effort to understand the foam generation and transport processes and foam-induced mobility reduction, we also developed mathematical models to explain the underlying processes and mechanisms that govern the fate of nanoparticle-stabilized CO 2 foams in porous media and applied these models to (1) simulate the results of foam generation and transport experiments conducted in beadpack and sandstone core systems, (2) analyze CO 2 injection data received from a field operator, and (3) aid with the design of a foam injection pilot test. Our simulator is applicable to near-injection well field-scale foam injection problems and accounts for the effects due to layered heterogeneity in permeability field, foam stabilizing agents effects, oil presence, and shear-thinning on the generation and transport of nanoparticle-stabilized C/W foams. This report presents the details of our experimental and numerical modeling work and outlines the highlights of our findings.« less
  • Geologic carbon storage (GCS) is a crucial part of a proposed mitigation strategy to reduce the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions to the atmosphere. During this process, CO 2 is injected as super critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO 2) in confined deep subsurface storage units, such as saline aquifers and depleted oil reservoirs. The deposition of vast amounts of CO 2 in subsurface geologic formations could unintentionally lead to CO 2 leakage into overlying freshwater aquifers. Introduction of CO 2 into these subsurface environments will greatly increase the CO 2 concentration and will create CO 2 concentration gradients that drivemore » changes in the microbial communities present. While it is expected that altered microbial communities will impact the biogeochemistry of the subsurface, there is no information available on how CO 2 gradients will impact these communities. The overarching goal of this project is to understand how CO 2 exposure will impact subsurface microbial communities at temperatures and pressures that are relevant to GCS and CO 2 leakage scenarios. To meet this goal, unfiltered, aqueous samples from a deep saline aquifer, a depleted oil reservoir, and a fresh water aquifer were exposed to varied concentrations of CO 2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The microbial ecology of the samples was examined using molecular, DNA-based techniques. The results from these studies were also compared across the sites to determine any existing trends. Results reveal that increasing CO 2 leads to decreased DNA concentrations regardless of the site, suggesting that microbial processes will be significantly hindered or absent nearest the CO 2 injection/leakage plume where CO 2 concentrations are highest. At CO 2 exposures expected downgradient from the CO 2 plume, selected microorganisms emerged as dominant in the CO 2 exposed conditions. Results suggest that the altered microbial community was site specific and highly dependent on pH. The site-dependent results suggest a limited ability to predict the emerging dominant species for other CO 2-exposed environments. This study improves the understanding of how a subsurface microbial community may respond to conditions expected from GCS and CO 2 leakage. This is the first step for understanding how a CO 2-altered microbial community may impact injectivity, permanence of stored CO 2, and subsurface water quality. Future work with microbial communities from new subsurface sites would increase the current understanding of this project. Additionally, incorporation of metagenomic methods would increase understanding of potential microbial processes that may be prevalent in CO 2 exposed environments.« less