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Title: The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

Abstract

We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particlemore » discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). College of Optical Sciences
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging; Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). College of Optical Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1221503
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-100301
Journal ID: ISSN 0168-9002
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830; P41EB002035
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 767; Journal ID: ISSN 0168-9002
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; Charged particle imaging detectors; Ionizing radiation; BazookaSPECT; Digital autoradiography

Citation Formats

Miller, Brian W., Gregory, Stephanie J., Fuller, Erin S., Barrett, Harrison H., Barber, Bradford H., and Furenlid, Lars R.. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2014.05.070.
Miller, Brian W., Gregory, Stephanie J., Fuller, Erin S., Barrett, Harrison H., Barber, Bradford H., & Furenlid, Lars R.. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2014.05.070.
Miller, Brian W., Gregory, Stephanie J., Fuller, Erin S., Barrett, Harrison H., Barber, Bradford H., and Furenlid, Lars R.. Wed . "The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2014.05.070. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1221503.
@article{osti_1221503,
title = {The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector},
author = {Miller, Brian W. and Gregory, Stephanie J. and Fuller, Erin S. and Barrett, Harrison H. and Barber, Bradford H. and Furenlid, Lars R.},
abstractNote = {We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nima.2014.05.070},
journal = {Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment},
number = ,
volume = 767,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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