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Title: Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets

Abstract

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) effort to deploy transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported petroleum, this study examines five school districts, one in Virginia and four in Texas, successful use of propane school buses. These school districts used school buses equipped with the newly developed liquid propane injection system that improves vehicle performance. Some of the school districts in this study saved nearly 50% on a cost per mile basis for fuel and maintenance relative to diesel. Using Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool developed for the DOE’s Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, the results showed payback period ranges from 3—8 years, recouping the incremental cost of the vehicles and infrastructure. Overall, fuel economy for these propane vehicles is close to that of displaced diesel vehicles, on an energy-equivalent basis. In addition, the 110 propane buses examined demonstrated petroleum displacement, 212,000 diesel gallon equivalents per year, and GHG benefits of 770 tons per year.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energetics, Inc., Columbia, Maryland; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V) (Clean Cities)
OSTI Identifier:
1220299
Report Number(s):
DOE/CHO-AC02-06CH11357-1402
6888
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
case study, propane, school bus, fleets, liquefied petroleum gas, LPG, Texas, Virginia, Alvin Independent School District, Dallas County Schools, Northside Independent School District, Ysleta Independent School District, Gloucester County Schools, Recovery Act

Citation Formats

Laughlin, M, and Burnham, A. Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Laughlin, M, & Burnham, A. Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets. United States.
Laughlin, M, and Burnham, A. Sun . "Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1220299.
@article{osti_1220299,
title = {Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets},
author = {Laughlin, M and Burnham, A.},
abstractNote = {As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) effort to deploy transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported petroleum, this study examines five school districts, one in Virginia and four in Texas, successful use of propane school buses. These school districts used school buses equipped with the newly developed liquid propane injection system that improves vehicle performance. Some of the school districts in this study saved nearly 50% on a cost per mile basis for fuel and maintenance relative to diesel. Using Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool developed for the DOE’s Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, the results showed payback period ranges from 3—8 years, recouping the incremental cost of the vehicles and infrastructure. Overall, fuel economy for these propane vehicles is close to that of displaced diesel vehicles, on an energy-equivalent basis. In addition, the 110 propane buses examined demonstrated petroleum displacement, 212,000 diesel gallon equivalents per year, and GHG benefits of 770 tons per year.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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