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Title: A Case for Including Atmospheric Thermodynamic Variables in Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading Parameter Identification

Abstract

This paper makes the case for establishing efficient predictor variables for atmospheric thermodynamics that can be used to statistically correlate the fatigue accumulation seen on wind turbines. Recently, two approaches to this issue have been reported. One uses multiple linear-regression analysis to establish the relative causality between a number of predictors related to the turbulent inflow and turbine loads. The other approach, using many of the same predictors, applies the technique of principal component analysis. An examination of the ensemble of predictor variables revealed that they were all kinematic in nature; i.e., they were only related to the description of the velocity field. Boundary-layer turbulence dynamics depends upon a description of the thermal field and its interaction with the velocity distribution. We used a series of measurements taken within a multi-row wind farm to demonstrate the need to include atmospheric thermodynamic variables as well as velocity-related ones in the search for efficient turbulence loading predictors in various turbine-operating environments. Our results show that a combination of vertical stability and hub-height mean shearing stress variables meet this need over a period of 10 minutes.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
12198
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-500-26829; ON: DE00012198
ON: DE00012198; TRN: AH200119%%378
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-99GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Second Symposium on Wind Conditions for Wind Turbine Design IEA Annex XI, Roskilde (DK), 04/12/1999--04/13/1999; Other Information: PBD: 2 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; CAUSALITY; DESIGN; STABILITY; THERMODYNAMICS; TURBINES; TURBULENCE; VELOCITY; WIND TURBINE ARRAYS; WIND TURBINES; FATIGUE; WIND ENERGY; WIND POWER; ATMOSPHERIC THERMODYNAMICS; WIND TURBINE FATIGUE; TURBINE LOADS; WIND FARMS; VELOCITY VARIABLES; TURBULENCE LOADING PREDICTORS

Citation Formats

Kelley, N. D. A Case for Including Atmospheric Thermodynamic Variables in Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading Parameter Identification. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Kelley, N. D. A Case for Including Atmospheric Thermodynamic Variables in Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading Parameter Identification. United States.
Kelley, N. D. Mon . "A Case for Including Atmospheric Thermodynamic Variables in Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading Parameter Identification". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/12198.
@article{osti_12198,
title = {A Case for Including Atmospheric Thermodynamic Variables in Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading Parameter Identification},
author = {Kelley, N. D.},
abstractNote = {This paper makes the case for establishing efficient predictor variables for atmospheric thermodynamics that can be used to statistically correlate the fatigue accumulation seen on wind turbines. Recently, two approaches to this issue have been reported. One uses multiple linear-regression analysis to establish the relative causality between a number of predictors related to the turbulent inflow and turbine loads. The other approach, using many of the same predictors, applies the technique of principal component analysis. An examination of the ensemble of predictor variables revealed that they were all kinematic in nature; i.e., they were only related to the description of the velocity field. Boundary-layer turbulence dynamics depends upon a description of the thermal field and its interaction with the velocity distribution. We used a series of measurements taken within a multi-row wind farm to demonstrate the need to include atmospheric thermodynamic variables as well as velocity-related ones in the search for efficient turbulence loading predictors in various turbine-operating environments. Our results show that a combination of vertical stability and hub-height mean shearing stress variables meet this need over a period of 10 minutes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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