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Title: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

Abstract

This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B) (Building America)
OSTI Identifier:
1219799
Report Number(s):
DOE/GO-102012-3480
5972
DOE Contract Number:
KNDJ-0-40339-02
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
drivers; air flow pathways; moisture transport; air infiltration; driving forces; duct system improvement; Building America; residential; residential buildings

Citation Formats

Cummings, James, Withers, Charles, Martin, Eric, and Moyer, Neil. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1219799.
Cummings, James, Withers, Charles, Martin, Eric, & Moyer, Neil. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. United States. doi:10.2172/1219799.
Cummings, James, Withers, Charles, Martin, Eric, and Moyer, Neil. Mon . "Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes". United States. doi:10.2172/1219799. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1219799.
@article{osti_1219799,
title = {Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes},
author = {Cummings, James and Withers, Charles and Martin, Eric and Moyer, Neil},
abstractNote = {This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.},
doi = {10.2172/1219799},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012},
month = {Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012}
}

Technical Report:

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