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Title: Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan

Abstract

Presentation given at the LERDWG Meeting, February 7, 2007, in Washington, DC.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. (ORNL)
  2. (DOE)
  3. (ANL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ORNL, DOE, ANL
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Analysis (EI-30) (Energy Analysis Corporate)
OSTI Identifier:
1219437
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
oil market analysis; OPEC; energy researves; trends

Citation Formats

D. Greene, P. Leiby, P. Patterson, and S. Plotkin, M. Singh. Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
D. Greene, P. Leiby, P. Patterson, & S. Plotkin, M. Singh. Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan. United States.
D. Greene, P. Leiby, P. Patterson, and S. Plotkin, M. Singh. Wed . "Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1219437.
@article{osti_1219437,
title = {Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan},
author = {D. Greene, P. Leiby and P. Patterson and S. Plotkin, M. Singh},
abstractNote = {Presentation given at the LERDWG Meeting, February 7, 2007, in Washington, DC.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Program Document:
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