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Title: Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices

Abstract

The project examined cases where metal casters had implemented ITP research results and the benefits they received due to that implementation. In cases where casters had not implemented those results, the project examined the factors responsible for that lack of implementation. The project also informed metal casters of the free tools and service offered by the ITP Technology Delivery subprogram.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Eppich Technologies, Syracuse, IN (United States)
  2. BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EERE Publication and Product Library
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Advanced Manufacturing Office (EE-5A)
OSTI Identifier:
1218651
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Industry; ITP; Metal Casting; Report

Citation Formats

Eppich, Robert, and Naranjo, Robert D. Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/1218651.
Eppich, Robert, & Naranjo, Robert D. Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices. United States. doi:10.2172/1218651.
Eppich, Robert, and Naranjo, Robert D. Mon . "Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices". United States. doi:10.2172/1218651. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1218651.
@article{osti_1218651,
title = {Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices},
author = {Eppich, Robert and Naranjo, Robert D.},
abstractNote = {The project examined cases where metal casters had implemented ITP research results and the benefits they received due to that implementation. In cases where casters had not implemented those results, the project examined the factors responsible for that lack of implementation. The project also informed metal casters of the free tools and service offered by the ITP Technology Delivery subprogram.},
doi = {10.2172/1218651},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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