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Title: Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices

Abstract

In an effort to assess the true effects of higher corn prices, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) commissioned an analysis on the impact of increased corn prices on retail food prices. This paper summarizes key results of the study and offers additional analysis based on information from a variety of other sources.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Corn Growers Association, Chesterfield, MO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B) (Bioenergy Technologies Office Corporate)
OSTI Identifier:
1218371
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
biomass, ethanol, corn, corn growers, food inflation, corn prices, food vs. fuel

Citation Formats

none,. Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/1218371.
none,. Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices. United States. doi:10.2172/1218371.
none,. Wed . "Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices". United States. doi:10.2172/1218371. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1218371.
@article{osti_1218371,
title = {Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices},
author = {none,},
abstractNote = {In an effort to assess the true effects of higher corn prices, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) commissioned an analysis on the impact of increased corn prices on retail food prices. This paper summarizes key results of the study and offers additional analysis based on information from a variety of other sources.},
doi = {10.2172/1218371},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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