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Title: The DOE Bioethanol Plant: A Tool for Commercialization

Abstract

This document details the pilot plant facilities available at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). With funding from the DOE National Biofuels Program, NREL constructed a fermentation pilot plant facility to test bioprocessing technologies for production of ethanol or other fuels or chemicals from cellulosic biomass.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EERE Publication and Product Library
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B) (Bioenergy Technologies Office Corporate)
OSTI Identifier:
1218345
Report Number(s):
DOE/GO-102000-1114
4000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
biomass, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, biomass processing, pilot plant, commercialization, process development unit, PDU, pretreatment, bioethanol, ethanol

Citation Formats

None. The DOE Bioethanol Plant: A Tool for Commercialization. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
None. The DOE Bioethanol Plant: A Tool for Commercialization. United States.
None. Fri . "The DOE Bioethanol Plant: A Tool for Commercialization". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1218345.
@article{osti_1218345,
title = {The DOE Bioethanol Plant: A Tool for Commercialization},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {This document details the pilot plant facilities available at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). With funding from the DOE National Biofuels Program, NREL constructed a fermentation pilot plant facility to test bioprocessing technologies for production of ethanol or other fuels or chemicals from cellulosic biomass.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}
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