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Title: Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1215331
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-64531
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2014 IEEE Symposium Power Electronics and Machines for Wind and Water Applications (PEMWA), 24-26 July 2014, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Related Information: See NREL/CP-5D00-62260 for preprint
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; wind power generation; photovoltaic power generation; power system oscillations; power system stability

Citation Formats

Singh, Mohit A., Allen, Alicia, Muljadi, Eduard, and Gevorgian, Vahan. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1109/PEMWA.2014.6912216.
Singh, Mohit A., Allen, Alicia, Muljadi, Eduard, & Gevorgian, Vahan. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities. United States. doi:10.1109/PEMWA.2014.6912216.
Singh, Mohit A., Allen, Alicia, Muljadi, Eduard, and Gevorgian, Vahan. Thu . "Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities". United States. doi:10.1109/PEMWA.2014.6912216.
@article{osti_1215331,
title = {Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities},
author = {Singh, Mohit A. and Allen, Alicia and Muljadi, Eduard and Gevorgian, Vahan},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1109/PEMWA.2014.6912216},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Conference:
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