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Title: PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

Abstract

Because wind power penetration levels in electric power systems are continuously increasing, voltage stability is a critical issue for maintaining power system security and operation. The traditional methods to analyze voltage stability can be classified into two categories: dynamic and steady-state. Dynamic analysis relies on time-domain simulations of faults at different locations; however, this method needs to exhaust faults at all locations to find the security region for voltage at a single bus. With the widely located phasor measurement units (PMUs), the Thevenin equivalent matrix can be calculated by the voltage and current information collected by the PMUs. This paper proposes a method based on a Thevenin equivalent matrix to identify system locations that will have the greatest impact on the voltage at the wind power plant’s point of interconnection. The number of dynamic voltage stability analysis runs is greatly reduced by using the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed approach for voltage security assessment for a wind power plant.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
Contributing Org.:
University of Denver, Denver, Colorado
OSTI Identifier:
1215151
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-63846
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2015 IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting, 26-30 July 2015, Denver, Colorado
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SYSTEM; PHASOR MEASUREMENT UNIT; FAULT DISTURBANCE RECORDER; WIND POWER PLANT; VOLTAGE SECURITY; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; NREL

Citation Formats

Jiang, H., Zhang, Y. C., Zhang, J. J., and Muljadi, E. PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1109/PESGM.2015.7286274.
Jiang, H., Zhang, Y. C., Zhang, J. J., & Muljadi, E. PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint. United States. doi:10.1109/PESGM.2015.7286274.
Jiang, H., Zhang, Y. C., Zhang, J. J., and Muljadi, E. Wed . "PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint". United States. doi:10.1109/PESGM.2015.7286274. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1215151.
@article{osti_1215151,
title = {PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint},
author = {Jiang, H. and Zhang, Y. C. and Zhang, J. J. and Muljadi, E.},
abstractNote = {Because wind power penetration levels in electric power systems are continuously increasing, voltage stability is a critical issue for maintaining power system security and operation. The traditional methods to analyze voltage stability can be classified into two categories: dynamic and steady-state. Dynamic analysis relies on time-domain simulations of faults at different locations; however, this method needs to exhaust faults at all locations to find the security region for voltage at a single bus. With the widely located phasor measurement units (PMUs), the Thevenin equivalent matrix can be calculated by the voltage and current information collected by the PMUs. This paper proposes a method based on a Thevenin equivalent matrix to identify system locations that will have the greatest impact on the voltage at the wind power plant’s point of interconnection. The number of dynamic voltage stability analysis runs is greatly reduced by using the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed approach for voltage security assessment for a wind power plant.},
doi = {10.1109/PESGM.2015.7286274},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 08 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Wed Apr 08 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Conference:
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  • Because wind power penetration levels in electric power systems are continuously increasing, voltage stability is a critical issue for maintaining power system security and operation. The traditional methods to analyze voltage stability can be classified into two categories: dynamic and steady-state. Dynamic analysis relies on time-domain simulations of faults at different locations; however, this method needs to exhaust faults at all locations to find the security region for voltage at a single bus. With the widely located phasor measurement units (PMUs), the Thevenin equivalent matrix can be calculated by the voltage and current information collected by the PMUs. This papermore » proposes a method based on a Thevenin equivalent matrix to identify system locations that will have the greatest impact on the voltage at the wind power plant's point of interconnection. The number of dynamic voltage stability analysis runs is greatly reduced by using the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed approach for voltage security assessment for a wind power plant.« less
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