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Title: Maskless Lithography of Nanometer-Scale Circuit Structures in Supported, Single-Layer Graphene Using Helium Ion Microscopy

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1214498
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: TechConnect Nanotechnology, Washington, DC, USA, 20150615, 20150615
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rondinone, Adam Justin, Iberi, Vighter O, Matola, Brad R, Linn, Allison R, and Joy, David Charles. Maskless Lithography of Nanometer-Scale Circuit Structures in Supported, Single-Layer Graphene Using Helium Ion Microscopy. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Rondinone, Adam Justin, Iberi, Vighter O, Matola, Brad R, Linn, Allison R, & Joy, David Charles. Maskless Lithography of Nanometer-Scale Circuit Structures in Supported, Single-Layer Graphene Using Helium Ion Microscopy. United States.
Rondinone, Adam Justin, Iberi, Vighter O, Matola, Brad R, Linn, Allison R, and Joy, David Charles. Wed . "Maskless Lithography of Nanometer-Scale Circuit Structures in Supported, Single-Layer Graphene Using Helium Ion Microscopy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1214498.
@article{osti_1214498,
title = {Maskless Lithography of Nanometer-Scale Circuit Structures in Supported, Single-Layer Graphene Using Helium Ion Microscopy},
author = {Rondinone, Adam Justin and Iberi, Vighter O and Matola, Brad R and Linn, Allison R and Joy, David Charles},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2014},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2014}
}

Conference:
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