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Title: How We 3D-Print Aerogel

Abstract

A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1214316
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; GRAPHENE AEROGEL; AEROGEL; 3D PRINT; 3D; NANOELECTRONICS; CATALYSIS; DIRECT INK WRITING

Citation Formats

None. How We 3D-Print Aerogel. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
None. How We 3D-Print Aerogel. United States.
None. Thu . "How We 3D-Print Aerogel". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1214316.
@article{osti_1214316,
title = {How We 3D-Print Aerogel},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Thu Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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