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Title: Auditing of sampling methods for air toxics at coal-fired power plants

Abstract

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) with subcontract assistance from international Technology Corporation (IT) has provided external audit activities for Phase II of the Department of Energy-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center`s air emission test program. The objective of the audits is to help ensure that the data obtained from the emission tests are precise, accurate, representative, scientifically sound and legally defensible. This paper presents the criteria that were used to perform the external audits of the emission test program. It also describes the approach used by ATS and It in performing their audits. Examples of findings of the audits along with the actions take to correct problems and the subsequent effect of those actions on the test data are presented. The results of audit spikes performed at the Plant 1 test site are also discussed.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
121392
Report Number(s):
CONF-9507159-
ON: DE95017240; TRN: 95:024007
DOE Contract Number:
AC22-93PC92583
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 11. annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference, Pittsburgh, PA (United States), 12-14 Jul 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]; Related Information: Is Part Of Eleventh annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference: Proceedings; PB: 440 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; TOXIC MATERIALS; SAMPLING; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; PERFORMANCE; AUDITS; QUALITY CONTROL

Citation Formats

Agbede, R.O., Clements, J.L., and Grunebach, M.G.. Auditing of sampling methods for air toxics at coal-fired power plants. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Agbede, R.O., Clements, J.L., & Grunebach, M.G.. Auditing of sampling methods for air toxics at coal-fired power plants. United States.
Agbede, R.O., Clements, J.L., and Grunebach, M.G.. Wed . "Auditing of sampling methods for air toxics at coal-fired power plants". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/121392.
@article{osti_121392,
title = {Auditing of sampling methods for air toxics at coal-fired power plants},
author = {Agbede, R.O. and Clements, J.L. and Grunebach, M.G.},
abstractNote = {Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) with subcontract assistance from international Technology Corporation (IT) has provided external audit activities for Phase II of the Department of Energy-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center`s air emission test program. The objective of the audits is to help ensure that the data obtained from the emission tests are precise, accurate, representative, scientifically sound and legally defensible. This paper presents the criteria that were used to perform the external audits of the emission test program. It also describes the approach used by ATS and It in performing their audits. Examples of findings of the audits along with the actions take to correct problems and the subsequent effect of those actions on the test data are presented. The results of audit spikes performed at the Plant 1 test site are also discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Wed Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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  • Fossil fuels contain trace amounts of heavy metals, which are the sources of air toxics when they are burned. If the combustion flue gas is not properly treated, the release of large amounts of these heavy metals can severely pollute the environment as experienced in some developing countries. Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are widely used to reduce the emissions of particulate matters (PMs) from flue gases at stationary sources such as coal-fired power plants. Properly designed and operated ESPs can remove more than ninety-nine percent of the incoming PMs. Wet scrubbers installed at the power plants were originally designed to reducemore » the emissions of sulfur dioxide. However, scrubbers are also known to be very effective to further reduce the emissions of PMs. Some of the heavy metals removed in the scrubbers are usually present in the form of dissolved cations in the scrubbing liquors. Uncontrolled release of such liquors may pollute the surface water. A simple and economical method to remove dissolved heavy metals from spent scrubbing liquors has been developed. Bench scale tests using simulated scrubber liquors were conducted. The liquors were doped with various amounts of lead, mercury, copper, iron, and zinc ions. The test data showed that majorities of these cations were removed by this technique. Implications of this technique at full scale facilities will be discussed.« less
  • The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires utilities to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions and study the potential effect of trace emissions, such as mercury from coal-fired power plants. With considerations such as fuel switching and/or sorbent injection, these choices can severely affect the particulate collection efficiencies of existing electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). As the particulate requirements become more stringent, successful control technologies must combine high removal efficiencies with system flexibility and cost-effectiveness. The use of advanced Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC) technologies can meet and/or exceed New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and provide consistent clear stack conditions whilemore » providing cost savings of as much as 60% in capital cost requirements in comparison to more traditional designs. Particulate emission levels have consistently been measured at levels of <0.1 lb/MMBtu on both full and pilot scale installations operating on a wide range of fuels.« less
  • Comparative bench-scale mercury sampling method tests were performed at the Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) laboratories for EPA Method 101A, EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro Method. Both blank and impinger spiking experiments were performed. The experimental results show that the ambient level of mercury in the ATS laboratory is at or below the detection limit (10 ng Hg) as measured by a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CVAAS) which was used to analyze the mercury samples. From the mercury spike studies, the following observations and findings were made. (a) The recovery of mercury spikes using EPA Method 101Amore » was 104%. (b) The Ontario Hydro Method retains about 90% of mercury spikes in the first absorbing solution but has a total spike retention of 106%. As a result, the test data shows possible migration of spiked mercury from the first impinger solution (KCI) to the permanganate impingers. (c) For the EPA Method 29 solutions, when only the peroxide impingers were spiked, mercury recoveries were 65.6% for the peroxide impingers, 0.1% for the knockout impinger and 32.8% for the permanganate impingers with an average total mercury recovery of 98.4%. At press time, data was still being obtained for both the peroxide and permanganate impinger solution spikes. This and other data will be available at the presentation.« less
  • The US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center is coordinating air toxics studies at eight power plant locations and 15 Clean Coal Technology project sites. Measurements span a wide variety of trace metal, inorganic, semi-volatile and volatile organic, and radionuclide substances. Sampling episodes and laboratory analysis have already been completed for several facilities. This survey paper summarizes the results to date, and describes the potential ramifications of these data under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.
  • This paper focuses on a study performed to assess the cancer risks associated with the inhalation of certain carcinogens emitted from the Mt. Tom power plant. This study was performed using an air toxics risk analysis framework. The framework includes two complementary models: the air emissions risk assessment model (AERAM) and the air toxic risk management model (AirTox). AERAM estimates potential human cancer risk due to inhalation of hazardous air pollutants emitted from coal-or oil-fired power plants. AERAM's detailed modeling of the emission and dispersion of air toxics provides estimates for data required in AirTox. AirTox calculates the total riskmore » from multiple sources and chemicals in a study area, the trade-offs between control costs and public health risks, and the impact of alternative regulatory requirements and potential abatement decisions. This analysis represents the first applications of the complete air toxics risk analysis approach using AERAM and AirTox.« less