skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus

Abstract

Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portionmore » is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [1]; ;
  1. U.S. DOE/NETL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research; National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1212145
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-625
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Simulation of IPR Water-Treatment
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; water; treatment; CO2; capture; oxycombustion; mhd

Citation Formats

Harendra, Sivaram, Oryshcyhn, Danylo, Ochs, Thomas, Gerdemann, Stephen, and Clark, John. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Harendra, Sivaram, Oryshcyhn, Danylo, Ochs, Thomas, Gerdemann, Stephen, & Clark, John. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus. United States.
Harendra, Sivaram, Oryshcyhn, Danylo, Ochs, Thomas, Gerdemann, Stephen, and Clark, John. Tue . "Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus". United States.
@article{osti_1212145,
title = {Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus},
author = {Harendra, Sivaram and Oryshcyhn, Danylo and Ochs, Thomas and Gerdemann, Stephen and Clark, John},
abstractNote = {Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portion is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1212145}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: