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Title: PR-PR: Cross-Platform Laboratory Automation System

Abstract

To enable protocol standardization, sharing, and efficient implementation across laboratory automation platforms, we have further developed the PR-PR open-source high-level biology-friendly robot programming language as a cross-platform laboratory automation system. Beyond liquid-handling robotics, PR-PR now supports microfluidic and microscopy platforms, as well as protocol translation into human languages, such as English. While the same set of basic PR-PR commands and features are available for each supported platform, the underlying optimization and translation modules vary from platform to platform. Here, we describe these further developments to PR-PR, and demonstrate the experimental implementation and validation of PR-PR protocols for combinatorial modified Golden Gate DNA assembly across liquid-handling robotic, microfluidic, and manual platforms. To further test PR-PR cross-platform performance, we then implement and assess PR-PR protocols for Kunkel DNA mutagenesis and hierarchical Gibson DNA assembly for microfluidic and manual platforms.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1211212
DOE Contract Number:
DE-0000206-1577
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY; Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Linshiz, G, Stawski, N, Goyal, G, Bi, CH, Poust, S, Sharma, M, Mutalik, V, Keasling, JD, and Hillson, NJ. PR-PR: Cross-Platform Laboratory Automation System. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1021/sb4001728.
Linshiz, G, Stawski, N, Goyal, G, Bi, CH, Poust, S, Sharma, M, Mutalik, V, Keasling, JD, & Hillson, NJ. PR-PR: Cross-Platform Laboratory Automation System. United States. doi:10.1021/sb4001728.
Linshiz, G, Stawski, N, Goyal, G, Bi, CH, Poust, S, Sharma, M, Mutalik, V, Keasling, JD, and Hillson, NJ. Fri . "PR-PR: Cross-Platform Laboratory Automation System". United States. doi:10.1021/sb4001728.
@article{osti_1211212,
title = {PR-PR: Cross-Platform Laboratory Automation System},
author = {Linshiz, G and Stawski, N and Goyal, G and Bi, CH and Poust, S and Sharma, M and Mutalik, V and Keasling, JD and Hillson, NJ},
abstractNote = {To enable protocol standardization, sharing, and efficient implementation across laboratory automation platforms, we have further developed the PR-PR open-source high-level biology-friendly robot programming language as a cross-platform laboratory automation system. Beyond liquid-handling robotics, PR-PR now supports microfluidic and microscopy platforms, as well as protocol translation into human languages, such as English. While the same set of basic PR-PR commands and features are available for each supported platform, the underlying optimization and translation modules vary from platform to platform. Here, we describe these further developments to PR-PR, and demonstrate the experimental implementation and validation of PR-PR protocols for combinatorial modified Golden Gate DNA assembly across liquid-handling robotic, microfluidic, and manual platforms. To further test PR-PR cross-platform performance, we then implement and assess PR-PR protocols for Kunkel DNA mutagenesis and hierarchical Gibson DNA assembly for microfluidic and manual platforms.},
doi = {10.1021/sb4001728},
journal = {ACS SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY},
number = 8,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Fri Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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