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Title: High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation

Abstract

We have developed and fabricated thin-film composite (TFC) membranes with an active layer consisting of a room-temperature ionic liquid/polymerized (room-temperature ionic liquid) [i.e., (RTIL)/poly(RTIL)] composite material. The resulting membrane has a CO2 permeance of 6100 +/- 400 GPU (where 1 GPU = 10(-6) cm(3)/(cm(2) s cmHg)) and an ideal CO2/N-2 selectivity of 22 +/- 2. This represents a new membrane with state-of-the-art CO2 permeance and good CO2/N-2 selectivity. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a TFC gas separation membrane composed of an RTIL-containing active layer.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1211153
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AR0000098
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research; Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 51
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhou, JS, Mok, MM, Cowan, MG, McDanel, WM, Carlisle, TK, Gin, DL, and Noble, RD. High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1021/ie5040682.
Zhou, JS, Mok, MM, Cowan, MG, McDanel, WM, Carlisle, TK, Gin, DL, & Noble, RD. High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation. United States. doi:10.1021/ie5040682.
Zhou, JS, Mok, MM, Cowan, MG, McDanel, WM, Carlisle, TK, Gin, DL, and Noble, RD. 2014. "High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation". United States. doi:10.1021/ie5040682.
@article{osti_1211153,
title = {High-Permeance Room-Temperature Ionic-Liquid-Based Membranes for CO2/N-2 Separation},
author = {Zhou, JS and Mok, MM and Cowan, MG and McDanel, WM and Carlisle, TK and Gin, DL and Noble, RD},
abstractNote = {We have developed and fabricated thin-film composite (TFC) membranes with an active layer consisting of a room-temperature ionic liquid/polymerized (room-temperature ionic liquid) [i.e., (RTIL)/poly(RTIL)] composite material. The resulting membrane has a CO2 permeance of 6100 +/- 400 GPU (where 1 GPU = 10(-6) cm(3)/(cm(2) s cmHg)) and an ideal CO2/N-2 selectivity of 22 +/- 2. This represents a new membrane with state-of-the-art CO2 permeance and good CO2/N-2 selectivity. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a TFC gas separation membrane composed of an RTIL-containing active layer.},
doi = {10.1021/ie5040682},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
number = 51,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
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