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Title: Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

Abstract

We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1210989
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AR0000426
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Simeonidis, E, and Price, ND. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1007/s10295-014-1576-3.
Simeonidis, E, & Price, ND. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering. United States. doi:10.1007/s10295-014-1576-3.
Simeonidis, E, and Price, ND. 2015. "Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering". United States. doi:10.1007/s10295-014-1576-3.
@article{osti_1210989,
title = {Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering},
author = {Simeonidis, E and Price, ND},
abstractNote = {We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.},
doi = {10.1007/s10295-014-1576-3},
journal = {Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology},
number = 3,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 1
}
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