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Title: Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons

Abstract

We performed measurements and analyses of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of polyurethane foam and glass microballoon foam at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. The RIC coefficient was non-linear with dose rate for polyurethane foam; however, typical values at 1E11 rad(si)/s dose rate was measured as 0.8E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 5 lb./cu ft. foam and 0.3E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 10 lb./cu ft. density polyurethane foam. For encapsulated glass microballoons (GMB) the RIC coefficient was approximately 1E-15 mho/m/rad/s and was not a strong function of dose rate.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. ITT Exelis Mission Systems, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); ITT Exelis Mission Systems,, Colorado Springs, CO
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1200673
Report Number(s):
SAND2014-4308
520336
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: Naples (Italy), 3-5 Jun 2014
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hartman, E. Frederick, Zarick, Thomas Andrew, Sheridan, Timothy J., and Preston, Eric F. Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.2172/1200673.
Hartman, E. Frederick, Zarick, Thomas Andrew, Sheridan, Timothy J., & Preston, Eric F. Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons. United States. doi:10.2172/1200673.
Hartman, E. Frederick, Zarick, Thomas Andrew, Sheridan, Timothy J., and Preston, Eric F. Sun . "Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons". United States. doi:10.2172/1200673. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1200673.
@article{osti_1200673,
title = {Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons},
author = {Hartman, E. Frederick and Zarick, Thomas Andrew and Sheridan, Timothy J. and Preston, Eric F.},
abstractNote = {We performed measurements and analyses of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of polyurethane foam and glass microballoon foam at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. The RIC coefficient was non-linear with dose rate for polyurethane foam; however, typical values at 1E11 rad(si)/s dose rate was measured as 0.8E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 5 lb./cu ft. foam and 0.3E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 10 lb./cu ft. density polyurethane foam. For encapsulated glass microballoons (GMB) the RIC coefficient was approximately 1E-15 mho/m/rad/s and was not a strong function of dose rate.},
doi = {10.2172/1200673},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Technical Report:

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  • We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.
  • We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.
  • We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.
  • In this report, measurements of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in 3 mil samples of Pyralux® are presented as a function of dose rate, pulse width, and applied bias. The experiments were conducted with the Medusa linear accelerator (LINAC) located at the Little Mountain Test Facility (LMTF) near Ogden, UT. The nominal electron energy for the LINAC is 20 MeV. Prompt conduction current data were obtained for dose rates ranging from ~2 x 10 9 rad(Si)/s to ~1.1 x 10 11 rad(Si)/s and for nominal pulse widths of 50 ns and 500 ns. At a given dose rate, the appliedmore » bias across the samples was stepped between -1500 V and 1500 V. Calculated values of the prompt RIC varied between 1.39x10 -8 Ω -1 · m -1 and 2.67x10 -7 Ω -1 · m -1 and the prompt RIC coefficient varied between 1.25x10 -18 Ω -1 · m -1/(rad/s) and 1.93x10 -17 Ω -1 · m -1/(rad/s).« less
  • An investigation of the decay in the thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam (PUF) with time is presented. The polyurethane foams studied included samples removed from sprayed PUF roofing systems on structures at Guam, Marianas Islands; Subic Bay, Republic of the Phillipines; Denver, Colorado; Clifton, New Jersey; and Port Hueneme, California. Thermal conductivity results closely agree with those predicted for a foam aged at 25 C in a controlled atmosphere. Results also indicate that the foam can provide good insulation characteristics in spite of poor application.