skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

Abstract

We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at themore » surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan)
  2. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1198411
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1206444; OSTI ID: 1346300
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-111023
Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0006742; AC05-76RLO1830; DESC0006742 (UCLA); DE-AC05-76RLO1830 (PNNL); AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Lee, W. -L., Gu, Y., Liou, K. N., Leung, L. R., and Hsu, H. -H. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-15-5405-2015.
Lee, W. -L., Gu, Y., Liou, K. N., Leung, L. R., & Hsu, H. -H. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains. United States. doi:10.5194/acp-15-5405-2015.
Lee, W. -L., Gu, Y., Liou, K. N., Leung, L. R., and Hsu, H. -H. Tue . "A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains". United States. doi:10.5194/acp-15-5405-2015.
@article{osti_1198411,
title = {A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains},
author = {Lee, W. -L. and Gu, Y. and Liou, K. N. and Leung, L. R. and Hsu, H. -H.},
abstractNote = {We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-15-5405-2015},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
issn = {1680-7324},
number = 10,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.5194/acp-15-5405-2015

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: